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A La Carte (10/25)

I was sitting in Grand Rapids airport on Saturday morning, about to catch a flight to Cleveland (and from Cleveland I’d catch a second flight to Toronto). It struck me as a little bit cruel that at the time there were two flights leaving from my gate—one going to Cleveland (for which I had a ticket) and one leaving for Toronto (for which I did not have a ticket). Ah well. I got there eventually (two or three hours after I could have).

Train Wreck - You may have heard of the train wreck R.C. Sproul was involved in many years ago (it was the deadliest crash in Amtrak history). In today’s blog post at Ligonier you can read all about it and see the meaning of providence through it.

Analog Rituals - This is a good little article on productivity. One thing I’ve learned in my studies on technology is that we tend to look for digital solutions to digital problems. But as this article shows, sometimes the best solutions are analog. Sometimes we just complicate things as we try to fix them.

Sale @ Monergism Books - Monergism Books is having a sale for the next few days. Place a copy of Tim Keller’s The Reason for God (DVD) and its Discussion Guide in your cart and receive 10 percent off any additional book (including everything in your cart) until November 1st. Simply type reasonforgod in the coupon code box at check out.

America: Land of Loners? - This article from The Wilson Quarterly, while written from quite a liberal perspective (with several obvious mis-steps along the way) does a good job of exhorting men to form friendships. It is ironic that when we are so connected online, we are less connected than ever in real life. This is a real “chew the meat, spit out the fat” kind of article.

Bankruptcy - Dr. Mohler lands another blow on the Crystal Cathedral. “In his 1986 book, Your Church Has a Fantastic Future, Schuller provided what he called ‘A Possibility Thinker’s Guide to a Successful Church.’ The book is a manual for a ministry built on pure pragmatism, sensationalistic promotion, a therapeutic message, and a constant and incessant focus on thinking positively. His message about money was simple: ‘No church has a money problem; churches only have idea problems,’ he asserted.”

Piper on Memorizing Scripture:

The thirteen inches from our child’s head to his or her heart is the longest distance in the world. —William Farley