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A La Carte (2/23)

In case you missed it yesterday (because I posted it a little later in the day), be sure to check out the special giveaway I wrote about. You could win a manuscript of a sermon preached by Charles Spurgeon. It’s a great little collector’s item.

Where Have the Good Men Gone? - This is an interesting article from the WSJ. “But for all its familiarity, pre-adulthood represents a momentous sociological development. It’s no exaggeration to say that having large numbers of single young men and women living independently, while also having enough disposable income to avoid ever messing up their kitchens, is something entirely new in human experience.”

The Feeling of Reading - I enjoyed this article about the feeling of reading a book. “As I held books that were thirty years old yesterday, flipping the dusty pages, reading autographs and inscriptions, and admiring cover art, I realized I’m missing something. There’s something, something I can’t explain, about the way a book feels to hold and read that no digital version can match. Yesterday I felt like I was holding a story, an entire world ready for me to explore—I’ve never felt that way on my iPad.”

Vatican Files - Reformation21 is beginning what looks to be an interesting series. The series, titled “Vatican Files,” will look at Catholicism in the 21st century.

8th Grade - Gene Veith looks at a test for eighth graders from 1895. I wouldn’t do so well on it.

Update on Said Musa - Denny Burk offers an update on Said Musa, the man imprisoned in Afghanistan. “Smeitana says that Said’s wife and children have already fled the country, that Said has been moved to a safer prison, and that the Afghan authorities are feeling the pressure from American officials to release Said himself.”

Piper on Technological Distraction - John Piper speaks on the growing problem of technological distraction and its relation to prayer.

We must never talk about the failure of Christianity. It is impossible for Christianity to fail. What fails is the shabby counterfeit to the real thing that we are willing to put up with. —Geoffrey King