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A La Carte (2/25)

Evangelizing the Children
Paul Martin: “Robert Murray M’cheyne was a godly Presbyterian pastor in Scotland (d. 1843). He loved to preach Christ to all he came into contact with, but especially to the children in attendance. He was a convinced paedobaptist, but knew water and covenants didn’t save, the work was up to the Holy Spirit in the real-time life of the child. I love to read his letters to children, one of which I offer here to whet your appetite.”
Tiger Has Converted to Another Religion
From the Christian Science Monitor: “Tiger Woods’s confession on Friday was a forced conversion to the Oprahite religion of emotional openness and making public one’s miseries and failings.”
Happier with the Bronze
Here’s an interesting study. “Research by three U.S. academics, who analyzed heat-of-the-moment reactions, medal-stand temperament and interviews of Olympians, shows that bronze-medal winners, on average, are happier with their finishes than silver medalists. Take silver, and you tend to fixate on the near miss. Score bronze, and you are thankful you were not shut out altogether.”
Digital Nation
This episode of Frontline is well worth watching (be aware that you’ll see glimpses of one or two graphic images). “Within a single generation, digital media and the World Wide Web have transformed virtually every aspect of modern culture, from the way we learn and work to the ways in which we socialize and even conduct war. But is the technology moving faster than we can adapt to it? And is our 24/7 wired world causing us to lose as much as we’ve gained?”
Toronto Pastors Conference
The theme of this year’s Toronto Pastors Conference is “Gospel Connections: Keeping the Death and Resurrection of Jesus at the Centre of Everything.” The keynote speaker will be Mike Bullmore.
Marry Him
This book looks quite intriguing. “Lori Gottlieb’s Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough, which first appeared a couple years ago as an essay in the Atlantic, has touched a nerve. A big one, it seems. It’s fired up bloggers and set off a barrage of e-mail exchanges shared by women.”