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Tim Challies

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A La Carte (4/4)

Baseball season is finally here, and I’m loving it. I don’t know what it is or why it is, but somehow life is just that much better when the boys of summer are doing their thing. And that’s true even if it’s going to be another frustrating season in Toronto.

The Place of God’s Disfavor - R.C. Sproul has a new book releasing this summer and it deals with heaven and hell. At the Ligonier blog you can read a timely excerpt on hell.

Freedom - Ali writes about a tough secret—that for many years she was addicted to pornography. And she writes about escaping the guilt of that sin.

God Loves You? - Bob Glenn asks, “Do you struggle to believe that God loves you?” Bob’s new to the blogosphere, but his blog is already one worth following.

The Next Story - Here’s a kind review of my book (which officially releases tomorrow!).

Why I Believe the Bible - Jim Hamilton tells why he believes that the Bible is what it says it is.

5 Myths About Gas Prices - “Gasoline prices have been steadily climbing for several months, and Americans are feeling the pain at the pump. The possible culprits (from greedy oil execs to Mideast turmoil) are as plentiful as the proposed solutions (more offshore drilling, green energy or government reserves). But what is really driving prices up? And what, if anything, can be done about it? Let’s take a moment to fill up on information about our fuel.”

Improbable Disaster - This article from the Washington Post provides an interesting take on some modern-day disasters. “When the government builds a levee, it may reduce the frequency of damaging floods but may also encourage even more people to build homes and businesses behind the barrier. When the Big One finally arrives, the total damage will be even greater than if no levee had been built.”

He Delights in the Asking - A sermon jam featuring Matt Chandler speaking about prayer.

The New Testament without the miracles would be far easier to believe. But the trouble is, would it be worth believing? —J. Gresham Machen