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Tim Challies

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A La Carte (5/2)

Called to Confess - I really enjoyed this article, written by Aileen’s best friend Stacey. She relates an experience she had, then looks at my envy articles, and takes it from there. “I sat down at the computer last night to write a blog post. Nothing came to me. Well, nothing in the form of a blog post anyway. Something else came, though. It crept in slowly, cautiously, masked and disguised as something far less ugly than what was actually hidden beneath.”

When Serpents Bite Granny - I’m a recent subscriber to this blog, but have been enjoying it quite a bit. Here’s a good post that borrows from John Newton: “Perhaps the most offensive claim of the gospel is that a hate-filled cannibalistic child molester finds the same redemption and has an equal status in the eyes of God as your dear old church lovin’, bake-sale havin’, baby burpin’ granny.”

Note to Self - The Kindle edition of Joe Thorn’s excellent book Note to Self is on sale. So too is Curtis Allen’s Education or Imitation?. David Murray’s Christians Get Depressed Too is still at $2.99.

Megachurch as the New Liberalism - This is a long but important article from Al Mohler. He looks at megachurches, and one megachurch pastor in particular, and shows how these churches play a crucial role in promoting (or destroying) Christian theology.

Why Am I Not Enough? - This article takes on a common question that comes when a wife finds that her husband has been looking at pornography—Why am I not enough for him?

Machine Politics - If you’re interested in working your way through a longform article, this one is really interesting (though you’ll have to put up with some bad language). It deals with one of the world’s foremost hackers.

Why Don’t Christians Care That They Sin? - Alistair Begg and R.C. Sproul answer this question at a Ligonier Ministries National Conference Q&A

There is no attribute of God more comforting to his children than the doctrine of divine sovereignty. —C.H. Spurgeon