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A La Carte (6/29)

Contend for the Faith - This is just a short article, but it asks an important question: “are we more eager to police other Christians’ theology, quietly gleeful when we diagnose error, or are we more eager to rejoice in what we have in common with other Christians? Both are crucial. Neither is negotiable. But which is our deepest joy and instinct?”

Baptized Lions and Talking Crosses - Timothy Paul Jones looks at a couple of real-life examples of how some writings ended up excluded from the churches’ collections of authoritative books.

Trashing Icons of Innocence - “In June of 1989, rocker Don Henley struck a chord with his melancholy musical commentary ‘The End of the Innocence.’ In that song, guileless idealism runs headlong into harsh realities of adult life. Divorce. Deception. Duplicity. But Henley’s Top-10 hit didn’t chronicle the final, dying breath of sweetness and naïveté in America. Twenty-three summers later, there’s still a little left. And it’s taking a beating.”

Toward Short-Term Missions - Darren Carlson continues his look at short-term missions. “In the first article I laid out the history of short-term missions and some of the opportunities it has provided. The second article pointed to some of the problems that surround the enterprise. Now I want to offer a way forward.”

Obamacare - “The Supreme Court this morning ruled that two main provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (commonly referred to as ‘Obamacare’) were, for the most part, constitutional. How did this happen? What does it mean for our constitutional system? Here’s a few answers.”

The London Olympics - The 2012 Olympics are ramping up in England, and so are the visualizations of all the data related to the games. You can see a collection of Olympic-related infographics at the link.

This Is the Gospel Project - This is a great little look at redemptive history via classical art.

Ah! if there be degrees in glory, they will not be distributed according to our talents, but according to our faithfulness in using them. —C.H. Spurgeon