Welcome to the online home of Tim Challies, blogger, author, and book reviewer.

Tim Challies

Challies on FacebookChallies on Twitter

A La Carte (8/26)

Parenting by Prayer - On parenting and prayer: “My kids are 15, 13, 11 and 3, and one of the main lessons that the Lord has been teaching me especially with the older three is the need to parent them first by prayer, and then by persuasion. As they have gotten older, I’ve come to believe that I spent too much time talking to them about them and too little time talking to God about them.”

Motherhood Is Application - On parenting and transformation: “If I had to pick one word to describe motherhood, I think that word would be ‘transforming.’ The days of a busy mother are made up of millions of transformations. Dirty children become clean, the hungry child fed, the tired child sleeping.”

Teaching the Trinity to Kids - One parenting and teaching: “Years of teaching 4 to 6 year old kids in SS has convinced my wife and me that music is a great means of helping children memorize Bible verses and doctrines.   I know nothing about the psychology of this, I have simply observed that words put to music stick in young minds more easily than words on their own.”

The Old Guys - This blog s a good one. Just about every day it shares a single great quote from an old, dead pastor or theologian. I guarantee you’ll benefit if you make it a regular visit.

Is Steve Jobs Dying for Us All? - Michael Horton asks the question. “Steve Jobs can’t really die for us. In fact, he is, like us all, a prisoner of sin and death. We may have better machines, but we will never emancipate ourselves from sin—and its penalty of death. By affirming death, Jobs proves himself not to be a very orthodox Buddhist. Now, we hope and pray, he will embrace the only solution. This gospel not only saves us from our sins; it saves us from the feverish and ineffectual striving to make something of ourselves, to be something, to become immortal at least in our legacy.”

Christ’s Omnipresence - Phil Johnson takes on a tough doctrine here. “So what about Jesus’ omnipresence? Did He not have to divest Himself of that attribute in order to be incarnated in a real human body? Didn’t he need to cease being everywhere present so that He could enter this world as a Man? Wasn’t His omnipresence necessarily suspended when He was placed in a manger?”

God is a sure paymaster, though he does not always pay at the end of every week. —C.H. Spurgeon