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Weekend A La Carte (8/13)

We’ve got one more day in the South before we begin to head north again. We’ll miss the people, but probably won’t miss the intense heat. Not that Toronto is all that much better this time of year. But still, a degree here and a degree there can make all the difference.

Dangerous Influences - Nancy Pearcey: “The take-away from Ryan Lizza’s hit piece on Michele Bachmann in the New Yorker is this: ‘Dominionist’ is the new ‘fundamentalist — the preferred term of abuse, intended to arouse fear and contempt, and downgrade the status of targeted groups of people.Bachmann told Lizza that a major influence on her thinking was my book Total Truth (‘Bachmann told me [it] was a ‘wonderful’ book’), along with the work of Francis Schaeffer, who I studied under.”

Legal Considerations - “Some of our pastoral staff recently attended a seminar for pastors provided by a trusted law firm in our area. Although our applications from this seminar might be different in other parts of the world, I thought I would share three action points we plan to take. I don’t offer any of these as legal counsel but as items worth considering.”

Not Able to Pastor - Jim Elliff writes about what happens (and what can be done) when a pastor can’t pastor his people.

Train the Untrained - I love the title of this one (the content is pretty good too): “Train the Untrained to Reach the Unreached.” “Why take the time train people to be faithful teachers of Scripture when untold millions are going to hell? That is a helpful question for me to wrestle through as I spend a good deal of my time training international pastors and church leaders.”

The Business of the Church - Eric Landry was at the Willow Creek Association’s Global Leadership Summit, an annual event hosted by Willow Creek Community Church and its pastor, Bill Hybels; he files an interesting report.

Dadaab Refugee Camp - “I first went to the Dadaab refugee camp, close to the border between Kenya and Somalia, at the end of 2006. Strangely enough, the camp was flooded then. The same parched ground recorded in my photographs was covered by 3 feet of water. Then, people were fleeing from the camp, not fleeing to the camp as they are today. Dadaab has become the largest refugee camp in the world, and Kenya’s fourth largest city: 440,000 people have gathered in makeshift shelters, made of branches and tarps.”

When sin is your burden, Christ will be your delight. —Thomas Watson