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Tim Challies

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New Commentaries & Reference Books

While I write many book reviews, the majority of these reviews cover titles that are written on a popular level. Rarely do I look at reference material or commentaries. Yet I do receive many such books and today I want to mention some of the more notable ones that have come across my desk recently.

The Acts of the Apostles by David G. Peterson (The Pillar New Testament Commentary) - With this huge addition to the series, the Pillar New Testament Commentary series now has eleven volumes. Though readers may not be familiar with the author, David Peterson, they will know of the series editor, D.A. Carson. In his Preface, Carson describes some of the challenges anyone will face when writing a commentary on Acts and then declares, “All of these challenges David Peterson has met superbly. His commentary focuses on what the text actually says, and his judgments are invariably sane, even-handed, judicious.” Acts is not a book that lacks strong commentaries but even then it sounds like this is a welcome addition to what is fast becoming a very valuable series. Carson’s endorsement pretty much seals the deal.

The First and Second Letter to the Thessalonians by Gordon D. Fee (The New International Commentary on the New Testament) - The NICNT has been underway forever, it seems (1946 is pretty close to forever). In fact, some of the volumes have already been replaced even while other books have yet to receive a first commentary. New to the series is this volume by Gordon Fee, now the editor of the NICNT and the author of the volumes on Philippians and 1 Corinthians. It is good to see this series grow one volume closer to completion.

Luke 1-5 by John MacArthur (The MacArthur New Testament Commentary) - With over one million volumes sold, the MacArthur Commentary series hardly needs an introduction. One the cover of this edition are accolades from Mark Dever, Al Mohler, C.J. Mahaney and Nancy Leigh DeMoss, all of whom affirm this as a valuable and understandable commentary useful for either pastors or lay persons. Can you believe it is currently the only MacArthur Commentary in my entire library (not including the ones in Libronix which I do refer to often)? I am glad to have it and hope to add the rest of the set as soon as I’m able.

Ephesians by Bryan Chapell (Reformed Expository Commentary) - I have often lauded this series, the Reformed Expository Commentary. I have read many of the volumes from cover-to-cover and look forward to reading through the latest, Ephesians by Bryan Chapell. Like its predecessors, it is based on a sermon series and is thus suitable for pastoral study or for personal study. I often use these commentaries in my personal devotions and have benefited from them a great deal.

1 & 2 Timothy and Titus by Samuel M. Ngewa (Africa Bible Commentary Series) - I know next to nothing about this new commentary series published by Zondervan (under their Hippo Books imprint—Hippo in honor of Augustine of Hippo, not in honor of the animal). The series is edited by Ngewa who teaches at Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology in Kenya. In this case I am not recommending the commentary as much as I am letting you know that it exists and hoping that someone can tell me more about it. I would love to hear from anyone who has had opportunity to read it through.

Tracts and Letters by John Calvin - Banner of Truth has recently published this huge 7-volume set of the tracts and letters of Calvin. Having just finished an engaging biography of Calvin I can attest to the value of those tracts and letters! The series comes in at 3488 pages but costs just $80.

The Whole Counsel of God by Richard C. Gamble - The Whole Counsel of God is a book, the first in a series of three volumes, dedicated to recounting God’s acts in the Old Testament. This first volume “discloses the theology of the Old Testament within the organic, progressive, historical development of the Bible.” It is more than an Old Testament survey as it includes discussion of a wide variety of topics such as ecclesiology, the nature of God, justification, and so on. It comes highly recommended by scholars such as Richard Pratt and John Frame. I suspect it will appeal primarily to scholars but pastors, students of theology and other thoughtful readers will undoubtedly find great value in reading it.