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Books I Didn't Review

Today I’ve got another batch of books that I didn’t review. Life is such that there are lots of great books that I just cannot find the time to read and many other books I’m simply not qualified to review. These books tend to find their way into these round-ups of the ones I received and looked at but for one reason or another just couldn’t review. I list them here in the hopes that at least some of them will be of interest to at least some of you!

Disciplines of a Godly Young ManDisciplines of a Godly Young Man by R. Kent Hughes & W. Carey Hughes – “Point blank, this is a punchy, no-holds-barred book for young men that lays out the call and command to be disciplined, godly, and sold-out for Jesus. Addressing topics such as purity in one’s thought-life, peer pressure, and perseverance as a Christian, this specially adapted work stands to influence a struggling generation.”

Loving Your Wife As Christ Loves the Church by Larry McCall (This book is a couple of years old, but new to me) – “In his typical crisp, biblical style, [McCall] lays out practical, biblical descriptions of various aspects of love - love that is practical, protecting, purposeful, passionate, praying, purifying, pardoning, and persevering. Every chapter concludes with discussion questions and action steps that make the book perfect for one-on-one mentoring, small-group discussion, or for personal thoughtful reflection. Foreword by Tedd Tripp.”

Against Calvinism by Roger Olson – “Roger Olson suggests that Calvinism, also commonly known as Reformed theology, holds an unwarranted place in our list of accepted theologies. In Against Calvinism, readers will find scholarly arguments explaining why Calvinist theology is incorrect and how it affects God’s reputation. Olson draws on a variety of sources, including Scripture, reason, tradition, and experience, to support his critique of Calvinism and the more historically rich, biblically faithful alternative theologies he proposes.” I really wanted to read and evaluate this and Horton’s volume, but simply did not have time or opportunity.

For CalvinismFor Calvinism by Michael Horton – “Taking us beyond the caricatures, Michael Horton invites us to explore the teachings of Calvinism, also commonly known as Reformed theology, by showing us how it is biblical and God-centered, leading us to live our lives for the glory of God. Horton explores the historical roots of Calvinism, walking readers through the distinctive known as the ‘Five Points,’ and encouraging us to consider its rich resources for faith and practice in the 21st Century.”

How to Read the Bible in Changing Times by Mark Strauss (endorsed by D.A. Carson) – “… shows everyday Christians how to interpret and apply the Scriptures regardless of time and culture. Rather than seeing the Bible as a magic answer book, a list of commands to obey, or a series of promises to claim, this insightful book allows the Bible to retain its identity as a complex, inspired document while showing that the truth it contains is relevant and life-changing.”

Finding Faithful Elders and Deacons by Thabiti Anyabwile – “Balancing thoughtful analysis of pertinent passages with thorough application for practical use in a contemporary context, Anyabwile answers the questions, “Who should we look for to lead and serve in the church?” and “What should they do to fulfill their calling?” Most helpful, perhaps, are the lists “Observations to make” and “Questions to ask,” which are provided for each characteristic described.”

Right in Their Own EyesRight in Their Own Eyes: The Gospel According to Judges by George Schwab (This has been a very useful series to me) – “… explains Judges from three Old Testament and three New Testament perspectives. First, it shows how the Spirit enabled wayward people to fulfill the mission God gave them, promotes David as king of Israel, and illustrates God’s covenant with his people. Schwab also shows how God sovereignly works among his wayward people to forge a community of faith under the New Covenant, which points to Christ, calls modern Christians to faith and obedience, and looks forward to the return of Christ and the final judgment.”

Mere Apologetics by Alister McGrath – “In the spirit of C. S. Lewis’s Mere Christianity, Alister McGrath’s Mere Apologetics seeks to equip readers to engage gracefully and intelligently with the challenges facing the faith today while drawing appropriately on the wisdom of the past. Rather than supplying the fine detail of every apologetic issue in order to win arguments, Mere Apologetics teaches a method that appeals not only to the mind but also to the heart and the imagination.”