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A La Carte

August 26, 2009
Wikipedia To Make Changes
I find this very interesting (and a good lesson on human nature). “Wikipedia, one of the 10 most popular sites on the Web, was founded about eight years ago as a long-shot experiment to create a free encyclopedia from the contributions of volunteers, all with the power to edit, and presumably improve, the content. Now, as the English-language version of Wikipedia has just surpassed three million articles, that freewheeling ethos is about to be curbed.” It seems that even Wikipedia cannot overcome human nature.
BibleWorks, Logos, Accordance
Keith Mathison has reviewed all three of these packages and he offers up a comparison of them along with recommendations of which is best.
Clothing Tips for Ministers
I somehow stumbled across this article by Don Whitney and quite enjoyed reading his tips on how a minister should go about building up a wardrobe.
Family Worship Guide
This site, set to officially launch in just a couple of days, looks like it will be a very good resource for any families seeking to begin or to improve their times of family worship.
Of First Importance
Greg Gilbert has a must-read article at the 9Marks blog in which he articulates some things about a whole strain of contemporary Christian thinking. “Time after time, in book after book coming off of Christian presses, the highest excitement and joy is being ignited by something other than the sin-bearing work of Christ on the cross, and the most fervent appeals are for people to join God in doing this or that, rather than to repent and believe.”
August 21, 2009
Chernobyl Then and Now
Here is an interesting series of photos showing Chernobyl back in 1984 and showing what it looks like today.
The Greenback Effect
Warren Buffet, in an op-ed at the Times, shares some staggering facts. “Congress is now spending 185% of what it takes in; the deficit is a post WWII record of 13% of GDP; the debt is growing by 1% a month; the US is borrowing $1.8 trillion a year.”
Josh Harris in Towers
Josh Harris is featured in SBTSTowers magazine (is it a magazine? a publication? whatever…).
30 Day Husband Encouragement Challenge
That’s the name of a challenge you can read about at Revive our Hearts. It is “a challenge to speak positively to and about your husband each day.”
The Senior Pastor Model
STR writes about (another) scandal involving (another) pastor and uses it as a bridge to discuss the potential failings of the senior pastor model.
August 20, 2009
Reformation Study Bible iPhone App
The Reformation Study Bible is now available as an iPhone app. Ligonier’s blog has the details.
A Quiet Circumvention of Morality
Dr. Mohler writes about women being involved in combat situations in the U.S. military. “From a Christian perspective, the concern about women in combat goes far beyond the pollsters’ questions. If we truly believe that God created man and women for different but complementary roles and shows his glory in the faithfulness of men as primary protectors and women as primary nurturers, the entry of women into combat roles is an open rejection of God’s purpose.”
The Tornado, the Lutherans, and Homosexuality
John Piper writes about a rather amazing situation in Minneapolis. “On a day when no severe weather was predicted or expected…a tornado forms, baffling the weather experts—most saying they’ve never seen anything like it. It happens right in the city. The city: Minneapolis.”
Why Read Christian Biography?
Biographer Faith Cook answers the question. “And strange as it may seem, the reading of Christian biography is one way to set before ourselves noble standards, goals and aspirations which can only help the Christian man or woman to make progress, not to gain any earthly accolades, but towards that ultimate prize of our heavenly calling - the glory to come.”
The Smallest Change, the Biggest Difference
Shaun Groves talks about the benefits to his family that came from getting rid of cable TV.
August 19, 2009
Let There Be Light
Here is an incredible photograph. It would make a great desktop background, I think!
Social Justice and the Poor
Kevin DeYoung is beginning a series that sounds interesting. “I want to take a look at what the Bible says about social justice and the poor. I imagine that this series will last a couple months, with probably a post a week on the subject.”
Suffering and the Sovereignty of God
At Amazon you can get the Kindle version of John Piper’s Suffering and the Sovereignty of God for free (for a limited time).
Deal of the Day: Mid-Week Markdowns CBD has a few interesting books for great prices in their mid-week markdowns. No Compromise: The Life Story of Keith Green, Preaching by John MacArthur and How to Be a Christian in a Brave New World by Joni Eareckson Tada all stand out.
August 18, 2009
Logos - A Review
Keith Mathison offers a review of Logos. “One of the premier Bible study software tools available today is Logos. Logos is perhaps best known for its digital library resources, but it has also made great strides in its original language research capabilities. In fact, at the present time, it has one original language capability that no other Bible study software program has. I will get to this feature below.”
Ten Digits
CNet says that just ten digits will change privacy as we know it. “The population of the world stands at about 7 billion. So it takes only 10 digits to label each human being on the planet uniquely. This simple arithmetic observation offers powerful insight into the limits of privacy. It dictates something we might call the 10-Digit Rule: just 10 digits or so of distinctive personal information are enough to identify you uniquely. They’re enough to strip away your anonymity on the Internet or call out your name as you walk down the street.”
Christian Apologetics Directory
Apologetics 315 has a roundup of web sites dealing with apologetics.
Finally Alive for Logos
Logos is giving away (for free!) John Piper’s Finally Alive to Logos/Libronix users.
Deal of the Day: Human Cloning
Evangelical Press is offering Eryl Davies’ book Human Cloning for the rather reasonable price of $0.01.
August 17, 2009
We Will Care for Any Baby
“Last weekend an Atlanta pastor made a promise that stunned his congregation and most of the people who heard it. In a speech that discussed abortion, the President, and the sanctity of life, the most provocative statement from Pastor Vic Pentz of Peachtree Presbyterian Church came towards sermon’s end: ‘I make a promise to you now and I don’t want you to keep this a secret,’ the pastor pronounced, ‘the Peachtree Presbyterian Church will care for any newborn baby you bring to this church…’”
I Refuse To Be Bored
Jollyblogger on Ben Franklin and boredom: “The experience of ‘boredom’ says far more about the one claiming to be bored than about the speaker, the event or whatever the alleged cause of the boredom. ”
Pray the Bible
Be sure to take a look at this new site. “The aim of the online publication of this ‘old-made-new’ monograph is to assist and encourage modern Christians in both public and private prayer.”
JC is not PC
John MacArthur is a guest voice in the Washington Post’s “On Faith” column. “Let’s be brutally honest: most of Jesus’ teaching is completely out of sync with the mores that dominate our culture.”
Office Hours: A Podcast
Office Hours is a new podcast that comes courtesy of Westminster Seminary in California. “Season I of Office Hours introduces you to the faculty of WSC through personal, 30-minute interviews, discussing biblical and exegetical questions, historical and theological questions, pastoral matters, and Christian living. ”
Redeemer Seeks New President
Redeemer College in Ancaster, Ontario, is seeking a new President. Information at the link for those interested.
Deal of the Day: Banner of Truth Sale
For a limited time, Monergism has reduced the prices on all of their Banner of Truth titles to the lowest you’ll find anywhere online.
August 14, 2009
Tweet Tweet
I enjoyed this article by David Sills. He writes about Twitter and other social media: “Someone has said that humility is not thinking less of yourself, just thinking of yourself less. Enter Twitter and Facebook. Humility used to guide believers to wait and let others praise them and not do it themselves. The heroes of yesteryear who reluctantly received the crowd’s adulation have been replaced with shameless personal promoters who peddle their self-made brand to as many as possible by all means possible—under the guise of social networking. I will admit that these folks seem to be larger than life superstars with all the news that’s fit to tweet, if it’s all true, but seriously, all this genuflecting is making my pants baggy.”
Coffee Drinking
Owen Strachan’s article on coffee drinking is worth the (humorous) read. “What you find on many websites is some kind of description like this: ‘I love reformed theology, U2, anything by Steven Soderbergh, and a fresh cup of joe.’ Or maybe: ‘My interests are theology, issues of social justice, Beastie Boys, and an Americano from (fill in neighborhood coffee shop here).’ Or perhaps: ‘Can’t resist a good Bonhoeffer quotation, Edwardsean philosophy, and a venti mocha with light whip.’”
Bonuses Break the Bank
This might make you mad.
Religious Book Sales Fall
“Sales of religious books saw a significant decrease of 22% in June continuing a yearlong trend, as overall book sales increased by 21.5% to $942.6 million, according to The Association of American Publishers (AAP).”
August 13, 2009
The Lost Art of Reading
Here’s an interesting essay on reading. “Reading is an act of contemplation, perhaps the only act in which we allow ourselves to merge with the consciousness of another human being. We possess the books we read, animating the waiting stillness of their language, but they possess us also, filling us with thoughts and observations, asking us to make them part of ourselves”
Eternity in Our Hearts?
Ed Welch looks at some well-known words from Ecclessiastes and wonders if we’ve been missing what they really mean.
Tribute to a Friend
Mike Delorenzo, missionary with Africa Inland Mission, remembers a friend. Frank Toews, an AIM pilot, was killed in a plane crash just a week ago, leaving behind a wife and four children. Be sure to also check out the WORLD article Mike links to.
Deal of the Day: Systematic Theology
Today RHB is offering a discount on Robert Reymond’s A New Systematic Theology of the Christian Faith. It “expresses a fully biblical Reformed faith, showing its enduring appeal, coherence, and truthfulness. Faithful to historic Calvinist convictions, this new benchmark of Reformed theology covers all the main teachings of the Bible and engages contemporary theological issues with the resources of biblical revelation and sound historical reflection so that the light of the Reformation continues to illumine the life of Christ’s church today.”
August 12, 2009
Standing Up for the Lord’s Day
Dan Walker is a presenter for BBC Sport and BBC Sports News. In this article he explains how and why he has always refused to work on Sundays.
Bubble Babies
Reader’s Digest looks with a skeptical eye at all of the gear being sold today to protect babies. “When your baby-goods store is selling saline-soaked, aloe-treated, grape-scented tissues designed to ‘ease’ the process of blowing your kid’s nose, it is safe to say: There is no kiddie problem too small, no discomfort too negligible, no danger too remote, that some manufacturer won’t come along and peddle a pricey product to prevent it.”
Why Gay Guys are Churchier
“A new survey of 9,000 gay, lesbian, and bisexual Americans from George Barna, a well-known evangelical pollster, showed that 70 percent of gay adults describe themselves as Christian and 60 percent say their faith is ‘very important’ in their lives. Granted, those figures are lower than the population as a whole, which register 85 and 70 percent on those rankings, respectively. But Barna, himself a Bible-believing, born-again Christian, points out that the numbers demonstrate that ‘popular stereotypes about the spiritual life of gays and lesbians are simply wrong.’”
Amazon Grab Bag Sale
Amazon has a “DVD Grab Bag” sale going on now. There are some pretty good deals available (including the set “When We Left Earth” that I’m watching and enjoying). (Obviously there’s a lot of junk there, too)
August 11, 2009
Perinatal Hospice
What an amazing idea! (And what a great alternative to abortion) “Perinatal hospice honors life. The woman carrying the disabled child receives extensive counseling and birth preparation involving the combined efforts of MFM specialists, OB/GYN doctors, neonatologists, anesthesia services, chaplains, pastors, social workers, labor and delivery nurses, and neonatal nurses. She carries the pregnancy to its natural conclusion.”
Learn to Put up With a Few Things
Here is some good advice from Mary Kassian’s mom as she looks forward to celebrating her 60th(!) wedding anniversary. “If you’re going to be married for 60 years, you have to learn to put up with a few things!”
Happier Talking Online
This article ought to concern parents of the MySpace generation. “Young people are taking refuge from reality in cyberspace, with more than a third feeling better able to talk about themselves online, new research indicates. A survey of British MySpace users aged 14 to 21 found that 36 per cent found it easier to talk about themselves online than in the real world and thought their online friends knew more about them than their off-line ones.”
How Fail Went From Verb to Interjection
The NY Times, in a pop culture primer, tells how the word “Fail!” went from being a verb to being an interjection as in “A conservative blog posts an image of a United States-Russian diplomatic agreement with the president’s name spelled ‘Barak Obama’ and calls it “White House Spellcheck FAIL.”
Fetus Models
Take a look at the photos of this new technology which allows the “printing” of 3-dimensional models of a fetus.
America’s Credit Card Mess
I’m mostly linking to this article because of the final paragraph which gave me a chuckle: “During the Roman Empire, the first anti-usury law—and I think this says it all—was found in the Council of Nicea in the 4th century. It states that no clergyman could practice usury, so you can get a pretty good idea of what was going on then—lending to the flock. The odd part is, the Council of Nicea was also the council that confirmed the concept of the Trinity. Those are probably two of the most unlikely pieces of legislation you could find in the same piece of canon law.”
Deal of the Day: Vision Video
Vision Video is clearing out some DVDs and there are a few good deals to be had.

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