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September 16, 2005

This is the sixth article in a series about Mark Driscoll’s book The Radical Reformission. You can find the first article here, the second here, the third here, the fourth here and the fifth here. We are reaching the end of the book; all that remains is today’s chapter and then the conclusion.

This chapter is an attempt to explain postmodernism. As anyone can attest who has attempted to define such a monster, arriving at a satisfactory explanation is no small feat. But Driscoll does quite a good job. He prefaces the chapter by reiterating the importance of the cultural mandate, though he provides no Scriptural support for this. “While we are here [on earth],” he writes, “we are supposed to be cultivating a culture like the kingdom…Culture is not something that God’s reformission people are merely to participate in; it is also something we are to cultivate, to plow, by living for the kindgom of heaven among the cultures of earth” (page 160).

Driscoll goes on to define postmodernism, at least as far as such a definition is possible. He begins by making four important points. First, postmodernism is basically a philosophical junk drawer into which people toss everything they can not make sense of. Ask four people for a definition and you’ll receive five answers. Second, postmodernity is not new, but was already being examined as a relic of the past as early as the 80’s. Third, postmodernity is simply another philosophy that is destined to pass away. And fourth, postmodern culture is not something that should be ignored, opposed or embraced; rather, it is simply another culture that Christians should seek to redeem.

The heart of the chapter is Driscoll’s list of seven demons that have entered the American church through what has been dubbed the emerging church. He warns that these are traps that must be avoided if we are to remain faithful to Scripture.

demon one: the Sky Fairy - Some church leaders see God as little more than an emasculated Sky Fairy who would never talk about sin or send anyone to hell. “As we work among cultures that value trendiness, we must not forget that the kingdom values timeless truths like sin, repentance, and faith that leads to good works” (page 167).

demon two: keeping it real…sinful - While emerging churches have placed emphasis on being real and genuine, many have taken this too far. “Because we are sinners, simply encouraging people to be who they are in the name of authenticity is dangerous because it can easily be taken as license to sin without repentance” (page 167). We must not forget that the Scriptures value repentance much higher than being real or authentic.

demon three: hermeneutics of the Dragon - Postmodernity poses a challenge to the church because it changes the rules of hermeneutics. Too many postmodern leaders keep the Bible but do away with its authority, choosing to play with the interpretation and meaning of particular texts. Driscoll states, correctly I believe (in fact, this is something I’ve often mentioned in articles on this site), that while the battle of previous decades was for the Bible’s inerrancy, the battle for our day is over the Bible’s authority and meaning.

demon four: from creation back to ex nihilo - Postmodernism is a philosophy dealing with deconstruction. Too much deconstruction, without a building plan, leads to homelessness. “This sense of homelessness pervades those who have undertaken to deconstruct God, Scripture, gender, sin, the meaning of life, and anything else they can find” (page 169). The danger to postmodern churches is that, like fundamentalist churches, they become known more for what they are against, or what they are not, than for what they are.

demon five: the custom is always evil - We live in a gluttonous, spoiled culture where everyone is a customer and everything is a product to be marketed. This applies as much to the church as to a box of cereal. Many postmodern Christians have accepted a consumeristic mindset where they expect a church to cater to them and to meet their felt needs. “But as we cultivate a counterculture, we must not forget that what people need most is to die to themselves and live for God. If we simply give people what they want, we will not be giving them what they need” (page 172).

demon six: the photocopy heresy - Deeply embedded in our culture is the myth of egalitarianism, that everyone is equal in every way. This denies the obvious: that God has created people with different skills, roles and abilities. A postmodern church that is addicted to egalitarianism will be confused over many issues, including those dealing with sexuality and gender. It may also refuse to acknowledge any authority, including that of pastor or elder. In advanced forms this may even diminsh God (through open theism, for example), to make Him more equal to us. As Christians we must remember the duly-appointed authority structures God has seen fit to give us.

demon seven: the hyphenated Christian - Postmoderns reject any authority beyond themselves and reject any claim to truth other than the claim that there is no valid truth claim. Postmodernism has rejected truth and settled instead on the idea of multiple truths, none of which is in any way absolute. The Bible, though, claims to be truth and to reveal truth. It claims to hold total authority over the life of believers. “As we work among cultures, we must never proclaim Jesus as God merely from our limited and biased perspective but rather as God and the King who rules over a kingdom that includes the cultures of the earth. And the view from his throne is not simply one of the many equally valid perspectives but truth” (page 176).

Driscoll’s purpose in addressing these issues is to show that all of them will bring a rapid and inevitable end to reformission. He also warns of them so that believers can avoid being mired in these pitfalls as they seek to build a kingdom culture. He promises that “in the final chapter, I will share with you what this looks like at our church and will try to inspire you to pursue the dreams that God has given you for the place in which you live” (page 176).

Reflections

I began my reflection on the previous chapter by noting, “This was probably the shortest and lightest chapter in the book thus far. I agree with the majority of what Driscoll teaches here.” While this chapter was not nearly as light, I would have to echo the second sentence once more. I found myself saying “amen!” each time Driscoll discussed one of the demons that plague the emerging church. As he addressed each pitfall I could immediately think of examples of people or churches who have fallen into exactly that error. It seems clear that Driscoll has spent a great deal of time studying the emerging churches throughout American and reflecting on what they are doing right and what they are doing wrong. I was especially pleased to hear his affirmation of the authority of Scripture, for if one has a biblical view of the authority of Scripture it seems likely that many other pieces of theology must necessarily fall into place.

I look forward to reading the final chapter and look forward to being able to reflect on the complete argument Driscoll presents in The Radical Reformission.

September 15, 2005

Some time ago I wrote an article entitled Purposeful Interference in which I claimed that Rick Warren and his representatives within the Purpose Driven organization had suppressed the publication of the book Pyromarketing: The Four Step Strategy to Ignite Customer Evangelists and Keep them For Life by Greg Stielstra. The article coincided with another brief article dealing with the same subject that was published by Publishers Weekly. The article was widely-read and talked about within other blogs.

Here is a quote which summarizes the article:

“Following the success of The Purpose Driven Life and other phenomena that displayed the value of PyroMarketing, Stielstra decided the time was right to publish a book explaining his philosophy of marketing. Without claiming credit for its success, he sought to explain the success of the book through the principles of his marketing philosophy. HarperCollins Publishers agreed to publish the book, which was to be titled PyroMarketing : The Four-Step Strategy to Ignite Customer Evangelists and Keep Them for Life and was expected to reach store shelves by mid-2005…Not long afterward, it appears that Rick Warren contacted Zondervan’s President, Doug Lockhart, and demanded that all references to The Purpose Driven Life be removed from PyroMarketing. Apparently this demand stemmed from a concern that this book would make a clear connection in the mind of the reader between The Purpose Driven Life and marketing technique. Lockhart returned to Stielstra, suggesting that he remove all references to Warren’s book and that he find examples of his marketing principles from the 2004 Presidential campaign. He declined. To this day Stielstra has refused to edit those portions of his book. HarperCollins has not published PyroMarketing and will give no indication as to when or even if they will do so.”

I later posted an update to say that HarperCollins had suddenly decided to proceed with publication with no reason provided as to the change of heart.

Since Then…

When I first published the story, it was conservative Christians who were most interested. Many of the conservative (and perhaps fundamentalist) blogs and information sites commented on the story. In the past few days the story has seen a resurgence of interest, but this time the epicenter seems to be the Emerging Church blogs. And this makes sense, doesn’t it? The Emerging Church is as opposed to “corporate Christianity” as are conservative Christians.

At the time I published the article Rick Warren had not commented on the situation. But in the middle of last month Rick Warren sent a letter to Christian Retailing in which he addressed the situation. It was only recently published. Here is the full text of his statement:

Statement by Dr. Rick Warren Regarding “Pyromarketing”

NOTE: I approve the use of this statement by “Christian Retailing” as long as it is printed in its entirety, and not edited. Rick Warren

I was serving in Africa, in the middle of a 35 day road trip with no opportunity to respond, when “Publisher’s Weekly” mistakenly reported that I oppose the publication of a book by Greg Stielstra. That is flatly untrue.

My only concern was that no one, neither Zondervan Publishing nor myself, claim credit for the astounding success of “The Purpose Driven Life” (PDL) book. The worldwide spread of the purpose driven message had nothing to do with marketing or merchandizing. Instead it was the result of God’s supernatural and sovereign plan, which no one anticipated.

Both Zondervan and Purpose Driven will confirm this. None of us feel we are smart enough to figure out how to make a devotional book by a pastor sell 25,000,000 copies — especially since there’s not a single idea in PDL that hasn’t already been stated repeatedly in historic Christianity over the past 2000 years!

I usually sign books with Proverbs 19:21 (NCV): “People can make all kinds of plans, but only the Lord’s plan will happen.” Or as Proverbs 16:1 (TEV) says “We may make our plans, but God has the last word.”

In fact, my plan for a 40-chapter book, a 40 Days of Purpose program, and my request to sell the book at a discount to participating purpose driven congregations was initially rejected and denied by the Zondervan marketing team due to fears that it would dampen CBA sales. Our friends at Zondervan acknowledge that they had nothing to do with creating the format of the book, the 40 day program, or enlisting the churches involved.

After the success of the first 40 Days of Purpose, Zondervan did offer to help our church with the logistics of serving thousands of more churches. We declined that gracious offer explaining that we wanted the 40 day program to remain ministry-focused, and not appear to be a publisher’s marketing ploy for a book in any way. The leadership of Zondervan agreed wholeheartedly with us and did nothing to enlist the 30,000+ churches that have used the program so far. We built a wall between the congregations and the publisher to maintain credibility as a local church-to-church program.

My request to Harper Collins was simply that Greg’s forthcoming book not use “The Purpose Driven Life” as example of “pyromarketing,” since that would be inaccurate. The effectiveness of 40 Days of Purpose spread from one pastor to another through word-of-mouth endorsement, not through anyone’s marketing plan. That doesn’t mean “pyromarketing” doesn’t work. It just means that it didn’t create the PDL worldwide phenomena!

In all of this I’ve had two overriding concerns; first, that everyone involved would humbly admit that we could never have planned or organized a phenomena of this size. We are all just small cogs in the giant wheel of God’s purposes. “For promotion comes neither from the east, nor from the west, nor from the south. God is the sovereign judge: he puts down one, and sets up another,” Psalm 75:6-7 (KJV). When you write a book that begins with the sentence “It’s not about you,” you want to be careful to not attribute the work of God to human methods, marketing, or plans.

My second concern is that skeptics would attribute the amazing miracle God has done to mere techniques or gimmicks. Newspapers and magazines do this all the time because they don’t understand the power of a life transformed by God’s grace so they look for naturalistic explanations such as advertising or marketing. God warns us of this tendency, “I feared that others would grab the chance to take credit for all of it, Crowing, “Look what we did! God had nothing to do with this.” Deut. 32:27 (Mes)

God will not share his glory with others. So my prayer is that all us involved will say, “Not to us, O Lord, not to us, but to your name be the glory,” Psalm 115:1 (NIV).

Rick Warren

August 16, 2005

Coincidentally (or perhaps not), Malcolm Gladwell, columnist for The New Yorker published an article about Warren in last week’s issue of the magazine. While I have been able to find only excerpts of the article, from what I have read it makes many of the same points as Stielstra makes in PyroMarketing.

The accounts I have read seem to show Warren at his most typical, acting as humble as he knows how, all the while dropping as many big names he can muster. “ ‘I had dinner with Jack Welch last Sunday night,’ he said. ‘He came to church, and we had dinner. I’ve been kind of mentoring him on his spiritual journey. And he said to me, ‘Rick, you are the biggest thinker I have ever met in my life. The only other person I know who thinks globally like you is Rupert Murdoch.’ And I said, ‘That’s interesting. I’m Rupert’s pastor! Rupert published my book!’” (see here). The article states as well that prior to its publication Warren predicted the book would sell one hundred million copies.

Flatly Untrue?

In his letter to Christian Retailing, Rick Warren flatly denies that he opposed the publication of PyroMarketing. “ ‘Publisher’s Weekly’ mistakenly reported that I oppose the publication of a book by Greg Stielstra. That is flatly untrue,” he said. Yet he goes on to say, “My request to Harper Collins was simply that Greg’s forthcoming book not use “The Purpose Driven Life” as example of “pyromarketing,” since that would be inaccurate.” It seems to me that Warren says, “I did not oppose the publication of the book. But the reason I opposed the publication of the book was…” Little wonder that people are beginning to accuse Warren of Clintonesque speech.

It is clear that Warren opposed the publication of the book because it contained material he felt was going to prejudice people against The Purpose Driven Life. His motives may have been pure. He may have genuinely desired that all the glory go to God. But no matter the motives, it is beyond dispute that he and the people within his organization opposed the publication of PyroMarketing.

It is painfully obvious that the success of The Purpose Driven Life did come, at least in part, because of marketing. This is beyond dispute. It is documented fact. While word-of-mouth marketing may have been the key to the book’s success, this word-of-mouth advertising was carefully manufactured by the marketing minds at Zondervan and Purpose Driven. Viral marketing is still marketing! “The effectiveness of 40 Days of Purpose spread from one pastor to another through word-of-mouth endorsement, not through anyone’s marketing plan.” That is untrue. The effectiveness of 40 Days of Purpose spread from one pastor to another because of a word-of-mouth marketing campaign engineered by Purpose Driven.

God Will Not Share His Glory

I find it strange that Warren refuses to admit that marketing played a key role in the success of The Purpose Driven Life. I do not see that this is anything to be ashamed of. As a Christian I see nothing inherently wrong with marketing. It can be an honorable pursuit, like most other pursuits, provided that it is done to God’s glory and in a way that brings honor to Him. Anyone who has been part of a church plant knows that God blesses advertising or marketing ventures, whether that be door-to-door visits or advertising in a local newspaper. We give our best to God, that He might be glorified through what we do.

Warren is correct when he says that God will not share his glory with others. But the presence of marketing does not negate the ability to give God the glory. We give God the glory when He blesses our efforts, whether or not they include advertising.

Links

Here are a few of the sites that linked to the story in the past few days.

djword.blogspot.com
www.jordoncooper.com
www.blog4icthus.com/
www.e-church.com
www.kinnon.tv
www.aaron.monts.cc

September 14, 2005

Care to share advice?

I am thinking of cosolidating my various RSS feeds (there are currently three per blog) and only publicizing a single RSS feed (through Feedburner) for each of the blogs. Is there anything I need to know about Feedburner before I do this?

September 14, 2005

Twelve Extraordinary Women.jpgJohn MacArthur wears a lot of hats. He is a pastor, theologian, author, teacher and president of a seminary. He also speaks at conferences and hosts a daily radio program. I assume he also finds time to spend with his wife and family. While he clearly excels at all of these roles, the one for which most of us know him best is simply as teacher of the Bible. And honestly, I cannot think of any man of this generation who does a better job of expositing the Scriptures. MacArthur has the amazing, God-given ability to make what is difficult seem simple. His years of passionate, careful, deliberate study of the Scripture have served to bring untold blessings to the body of Christ.

John MacArthur is one of my favorite teachers and his books have had a profound influence on my life and have done much to shape my theology. I was thrilled to be given the opportunity to preview his upcoming book, Twelve Extraordinary Women, which is due for publication later this year.

Preview

Twelve Ordinary Men, John MacArthur’s book on the apostles, was a surprise hit. After the book stayed on the bestseller lists for over a year, Thomas Nelson suggested publishing a second volume, this one dealing with some of the best-known women of the Bible. MacArthur accepted the challenge and drew up a long list of possible subjects. “I admit that I chose the twelve women featured here by a completely unscientific process: I weighed their relative importance in biblical history alongside the amount of material I had already developed on each of them as I have taught through various passages of Scripture. Then I chose the twelve women who were most familiar to me.” Twelve Extraordinary Women is not exactly a sequel to MacArthur’s Twelve Ordinary Men, yet it bears many similarities. Like its predecessor (and unlike the majority of MacArthur’s books), Twelve Extraordinary Women is not primarily expository. Instead, it is a series of brief character studies. Like Twelve Ordinary Men, it is ideally suited for personal or group study, and is intensely practical.

The women MacArthur chose as subjects for this book are: Eve, Sarah, Rahab, Ruth, Hannah, Mary, Anna, The Samaritan Woman, Martha and Mary, Mary Magdalene and Lydia. “My prayer for you is that as you read this book you will share their faith, imitate their faithfulness, and learn to love the Savior whose work in their lives made them truly extraordinary. Your life can be extraordinary, too, by His wonderful grace.”

The format of the book will be familiar to those who have read Twelve Ordinary Men. MacArthur spends a chapter discussing each of the women (though Martha and Mary share a single chapter) and shows that what made each of these women extraordinary was nothing they brought to God, but the work of the Savior in their lives. Each of them had a deep reverence towards God and trusted His promises, whether they looked forward to a time when the Savior would come, or whether they looked back at his death and resurrection. Some of them stood between the New and Old Testament eras, even witnessing with their own eyes the redemptive sacrifice of Jesus Christ.

By way of introduction, MacArthur writes about the high position given to women within Scripture. Women are never relegated to a secondary status and, unlike so many other religions, are never degraded and considered less important than men. From the beginning of the New Testament era to the close of the canon of Scripture we see God granting extraordinary privilege to women. There are countless women in the Bible who stand as examples of faithfulness, integrity, hospitality and every other admirable virtue. “The faithfulness of these women is their true, lasting legacy. I hope as you meet them in Scripture and get to know more about their lives and characters, they will challenge you, motivate you, encourage you, and inspire you with love for the God whom they trusted and served. May your heart be set ablaze with the very same faith, may your life be characterized by a similar faithfulness, and may your soul be overwhelmed with love for the extraordinary God they worshiped.”

Each of the subsequent eleven chapters is a study of a particular woman, with MacArthur shining light on the Scriptural accounts of each subject. Each chapter is practical, showing how the virtues exemplified in the lives of the women can be applied to the life of the reader. The reader is show how he, too, can be extraordinary through the power of God.

What Others Are Saying

At this point I have not been able to find any endorsements for this book. It seems to me that with John MacArthur’s long track-record of successful, biblical books he hardly needs endorsements!

Content

Preface
 Introduction

1. Eve: Mother of All Living
2. Sarah: Hoping Against Hope
3. Rahab: A Horrible Life Redeemed
4. Ruth: Loyalty and Love
5. Hannah: A Portrait of Feminine Grace
6. Mary: Blessed Among Women
7. Anna: The Faithful Witness
8. The Samaritan Woman: Finding the Water of Life
9. Martha and Mary: Working and Worshiping
10. Mary Magdalene: Delivered from Darkness
11. Lydia: A Hospitable Heart Opened

Epilogue

Conclusion

Twelve Extraordinary Women is a worthy successor to Twelve Ordinary Men. This book is both informative and inspiring. It will lead the reader to understand what each of these twelve women surely knew, that God was the truly extraordinary one, as He conformed such ordinary women to the likeness of their Savior. I highly recommend this book for both personal and group study.

Availability

Twelve Extraordinary Women is being published by Nelson Books and according to Amazon will be available on the 1st of November, 2005. It is already available for pre-order:

It appears that in addition to the book, Thomas Nelson is publishing:

  • A Study Guide (which is not yet available at Amazon). For future reference, the SKU for the guide is 1418505579. The guide will contain “Insightful Questions for In-Depth Study, Places to Journal and Guided Prayers.”
  • An Audio CD. You can pre-order it from Amazon here.
September 13, 2005

This is the fourth article in a series about Mark Driscoll’s book The Radical Reformission. You can find the first article here, the second here, the third here and the fourth here. Today we arrive at a chapter cryptically entitled “the sin of light beer.” As usual the subtitle is more helpful: “how syncretism and sectarianism undermine reformission.”

In this chapter Driscoll discusses the opposing concepts of syncretism and sectarianism. He uses the examples of the Pharisees, Sadducees, Zealots and Essenes to highlight four unbiblical reactions to culture. The Pharisees were sectarian, developing an unending number of laws to seperate themselves from the common people. The Sadducees were syncretists, compromising their beliefs in order to blend into the culture. The Zealots misused culture as they attempted to usher in God’s kingdom through the use of force. The Essenes ignored culture altogether, retreating from society where they could seek mystical encounters with God in monkish privacy.

“The problem with each of these ruts is that they are ways of seeking godliness, as we define it, rather than as God defines it. But the things that those who are stuck in them desire (holiness, cultural relevance, social transformation, spiritual experience) can’t be brought about by legalism, liberalism, legislation or lunacy; instead, they are natural effects of faith in the powerful gospel and come from God alone to those who are about his reformission business” (page 142). As he repents of both of these forces, Driscoll writes, “The problem with both syncretism and sectarianism is that they deny the clear teaching of the Scriptures that the power of God unleashed through the gospel of Jesus Christ can transform anyone. Sectarians do not live by the necessary faith in the gospel and therefore believe that evil hearts and sinful actions and worldly social structures are more powerful than God, unable to be redeemed, and therefore are a waste of our energies because they are destined to be meat on God’s grill anyway, so why bother? Likewise, syncretists do not live by the necessary faith in the gospel and therefore believe that the hearts of people aren’t that bad, their actions aren’t that sinful, and since people are doing the best they can, we can’t expect any sort of radical transformation, and so we should simply bless them with a sentimental love” (page 145).

And so we see that Sectarians love God but fail to love their neighbors, while syncretists love their neighbors but fail to love God.

The final part of the chapter is a long discussion of attitudes towards alcohol within the church. Driscoll believes, as I do, that we have freedom to decide whether or not we would like to drink (in moderation, of course). I was left a little confused as to why he chose to address this particular issue in such depth, as it did not seem to highlight syncretism and sectarianism as well as another issue might have. Regardless, he felt it was relevant to the topic at-hand. The chapter concludes with these words: “Here’s what I’d like you to remember from this chapter: reformission is not about abstention; it is about redemption. We must throw ourselves into the culture so that all that God made good is taken back and used in a way that glorifies him. Our goal is not to avoid drinking, singing, working, playing, eating, love-making, and the like. Instead, our goal must be to redeem those things through the power of the gospel so that they are used rightly according to Scripture, bringing God glory and his people a satisfied joy” (page 152).

Reflections

This was probably the shortest and lightest chapter in the book thus far. I agree with the majority of what Driscoll teaches here. I have seen plenty of first-hand evidence of the dangers of both syncretism and sectarianism and have been closer to both of those than I would like to admit. Driscoll is right in his conclusion that both of these errors lead to an outright denial of the power of the gospel; they lead people to depend on themselves rather than God. His warning against these forces is useful and powerful.

The only area in which I found myself in potential disagreement with Driscoll is in his discussion of redeeming culture. I suppose I am not so sure that God has asked us to redeem culture. God’s primary interest is, of course, in people. This is something I know Driscoll would affirm. But Driscoll would suggest that we are also to focus on the redemption of music, film, and every other area of culture. I am not so sure. I guess the trouble is that I do not see the biblical mandate for the redemption of culture. Neither does Driscoll provide satisfactory biblical proof. So this is an area to which I will have to dedicate further time and reflection.

We continue soon with the final chapter.

September 12, 2005

Humility True GreatnessI’ve often wondered how I missed out on C.J. Mahaney’s books for so long. While I’ve now read several of them, I did not read the first until earlier this year. And now I’m hooked. I love Mahaney’s style of writing in which he blends sound, biblical teaching with humility and just the right amount of humor. I’ve found his books to be practical, yet not legislative, as if we needed him to dictate every aspect of the reader’s life. I was excited, then, to be given a sneak-peek at his upcoming title, Humility: True Greatness. What follows is a short preview of this book, due for release next month.

Preview

There is a certain irony in the pursuit of humility. We see a glimpse of that in the title of this book, Humility: True Greatness. Humility is true greatness. The pursuit of humility and the pursuit of greatness are one and the same, provided that we seek greatness as defined by the Creator. I have never met C.J. Mahaney (though hope to some day), but from all accounts he is well-qualified to write a book on such a difficult subject. And this is a difficult topic. After all, how can a person write a book on humility without sounding like he feels he is most qualified? The truth is he can, provided he uses the Scripture as the foundation for his teaching. And that is exactly what Mahaney does.

The book is divided into three sections. Part one deals with the battle of humility versus pride, part two with our Savior and the secret of true greatness and part three with the practice of true humility.

In the first part, Mahaney defines humility and shows how true humility is nothing less than a battle against the pride that lives deep within every heart. “Humility is honestly assessing ourselves in the light of God’s holiness and our sinfulness.” These two realities must be the foundation of any definition of humility: our sinfulness and God’s holiness. This is precisely why true greatness can only be achieved by followers of Jesus Christ, for only they have had their eyes opened by the Holy Spirit to see the depth of their own depravity and the overwhelming holiness of God.

Mahaney teaches, rightly I believe, that God hates the sin of pride above all other sin. This is a sin that plagues all humans, though it manifests itself in different ways. So the issue facing the believer is he examines his life is not if pride is present, but where it is present. For most of us it is deeply ingrained in our lives and only a great amount of Spirit-guided self-examination can draw it to the surface.

In the second part, Mahaney defines greatness as Jesus did, showing that being great means being a servant to everyone. Just as Jesus came to serve, so must we serve with our lives. Christ lived as the perfect example of humble service. As in all his books, Mahaney leads the reader to the cross, stating that apart from Christ’s sacrifice, there is no serving. We can only attain true greatness by emulating Christ’s example - the example that led him to the cross where He made the greatest sacrifice.

In the third and final part of the book Mahaney builds on the foundation he has built through Scripture to provide advice on the practice of humility. This is far more than a bullet list of do’s and don’ts. It is far more than a false, monastic humility that is really no humility at all. Instead, he examines several different areas of life and shows how humility can be applied to all of them. From the moment we wake up to the moment we fall asleep (and even while we are asleep) we can practice humility. Whether we experience joy or pain, whether we are correcting or being corrected, we all have opportunities to practice humility every day.

Humility: True Greatness is a truly great book. I do not know of a person who shows no pride in his life, and thus I do not know of a person who would not benefit from reading it. I highly and unreservedly recommend this book. I pray that it will be widely-read, that humility may be widely-practiced.

What Others Are Saying

Here are some endorsements written by men who are far more discerning (and, in all likelihood, far more humble) than I am.

“This is the right book from the right man at the right time. More than any other man I have known, C. J. Mahaney has taught me what humility really is. This is a man whose humility is a gift to the entire church. He knows that humility is strength, and that God uses the humble in a powerful way. He understands the danger of pride, and calls us all to aspire to a legacy of greatness-a greatness that shows the entire world the glory of God. He points us to a cross-centered worldview that will transform every dimension of life.”
-R. Albert Mohler, Jr.

“God hates it. The Bible is pretty clear on that fact. Yet, our culture exalts it. For many people, if not most, pride is seen as a virtue. We are expected to be proud of ourselves, our accomplishments, our looks, our possessions, our family, our friends. We are to call attention to whom we know, what we’ve done, where we’ve been. We are to promote ourselves and anything associated with us. We’re even encouraged to apply bumper stickers that proclaim the superiority of our child over the less gifted children at school.

Perhaps the most prideful are those who express a supposed humility, and yet take pride in their excellent character. An even more subtle example is the individual who is devastated by the reality of personal failure (this is actually self-love…he is simply shocked at seeing himself as he really is).

It’s all pride. And God’s hatred of it, whether subtle or overt, will never change.

We need to be reminded daily that God is opposed to the proud. We need to be told once again what greatness is in the eyes of God. This is important for God’s leaders in the church, for His leaders in families, and for anyone who desires to live a life of excellence that is pleasing to Him.

I am grateful for C.J. Mahaney’s honest and accurate treatment of this ‘accepted’ sin. Let the truth that is explained in this book break you of pride and reap within you the pleasing aroma of humility. God not only is opposed to the proud, but He exalts the humble.”
-John MacArthur

“My friend C.J. Mahaney tackles a subject of immense importance. Since God opposes the proud and gives grace to the humble, what could be more important than understanding and developing true humility, as a lightning rod for grace? C. J.’s book is biblical, honest and full of helpful insights. We need less egomania and more humility and servanthood in our churches today. May God use this book to remind us that ‘only the humble are sane.’”
-Randy Alcorn

“This is a wonderful, sobering, humbling, God-centered, Bible-based book on humility by an author who truly exemplifies it in his own life. I especially appreciated Mahaney’s suggestions for practical disciplines to help us cultivate humility before God. This book’s message will tend to keep us and our churches from self-destruction due to pride, will make us thankful for little blessings in everyday life, and will bring us closer to God.”
-Wayne Grudem

“Humility is seldom thought about in our Christian community. In his masterful way, C.J. Mahaney gives us a much-needed wake-up call on this important subject. I highly recommend this book.”
-Jerry Bridges

Content

Foreword by Joshua Harris
 Introduction

PART I
OUR GREATEST FRIEND, OUR GREATEST ENEMY
The Battle of Humility Versus Pride

CHAPTER 1
The Promise of Humility

CHAPTER 2
The Perils of Pride

PART II
THE GREAT REVERSAL
Our Savior and the Secret of True Greatness

CHAPTER 3
Greatness Redefined

CHAPTER 4
Greatness Demonstrated

PART III
OUR GREAT PURSUIT
The Practice of True Humility

CHAPTER 5
As Each Day Begins

CHAPTER 6
As Each Day Ends

CHAPTER 7
For Special Focus

CHAPTER 8
Identifying Evidences of Grace

CHAPTER 9
Encouraging Others

CHAPTER 10
Inviting and Pursuing Correction

CHAPTER 11
Responding Humbly to Trials

CHAPTER 12
A Legacy of Greatness

A Final Word

How to Weaken Pride and Cultivate Humility:
A List of Suggestions

Conclusion

Humility: True Greatness is a wonderful book and one I highly recommend. In fact, it is one of the best, most practical books I have read all year long and my favorite of Mahaney’s books. I cannot think of a person who would not benefit from it.

Availability

The book is being published by Multnomah Publishers and is set to be released on October 23. It is currently available for pre-order from Amazon (and it’s only $10, too!).

September 10, 2005

MovabletypeA couple of weeks ago Six Apart released the latest version of Movabletype, the software that lies at the heart of this site and hundreds of thousands of other blogs. The new version, 3.2, offers so many new features that it could almost have been called version 4.0. Here are a few of my favorite features and wishlist of things I would like to see in the future:

New Features

  • New Dashboard - The first screen the user sees when logging into the administrative interface has been tidied up and the functionality has been increased. A couple of useful plugins and a new Stylesheet go a long way to making it even better.
  • Spam protection - Perhaps the single greatest annoyance when it comes to blogging is dealing with spammers. Many of us deal with, literally, hundreds or even thousands of spam attempts every day. The new version of MT has a great tool for dealing with this problem in the form of SpamLookup. This plugin was released for MT 3.x but has been incorporated into the software for the new release. While I do not use the commenting system in MT, I do use the trackbacks. A couple of weeks after installing MT 3.2, the program has blocked all of the thousands of trackback spam attempts while properly allowing most of the legitimate trackbacks. The protection is perhaps a little bit too strong, as it does block some legitimate trackbacks. But it’s hard to complain.
  • Plugin Management - Plugins can now be disabled without being removed (similar to WordPress). There is also a central repository that displays all the tags the plugins make available.
  • There are many other improvements, but these are the ones I felt were most beneficial to me.

Plugins

Movabletype has always had a great community developing some incredible plugins that extend the functionality of the program far beyond what Six Apart provides. The “out of the box” experience is negligible compared to what it can be when it has been “plugge-in.” Here are some of the most important plugins:

  • BigPAPI - This plugin does nothing in and of itself, but does allow some great functionality for other plugins. It is a must-have for MT 3.2.
  • UpdateAuthoredOn - Corrects one of MT’s most inexcusible oversights - the lack of an “update” button to insert the current time in the date field when making a post.
  • EnhancedEntryEditing - Adds WYSIWYG capabilities to the entry fields relying on the TinyMCE utility. This is a great improvement on the hack for previous versions of MT which relied on HTMLArea. Unfortunately there are some small problems in Firefox but I trust those will be resolved soon.
  • StatWatch - A tiny utility that allows the site owner to track visits to the site. It is a great concept, though needs to be extended to be a serious competitor to SiteMeter. One great feature is that it breaks down traffic by blog for those of us who have multiple blogs in one installation of Movabletype.
  • Media Manager - This is the successor to BookQueueToo, the utility that allows tracking of Amazon wishlists, reviews, reading queues, and so on. It is newly upgraded for MT 3.2 and looks great.

Wishlist

There are a few features I would still like to see. Among them are:

  • Scheduled posting that does not rely on cronjobs. Many servers do not allow the type of cronjob necessary to allow scheduled posting to be effective.
  • A native WYSIWYG interface, or at the very least one that has been properly tested and implemented.
  • A utility for managing site assets such as graphics, photos, etc. This is an inexcusible oversight and something that is desperately needed. There is currently no way of managing photos that have been uploaded to the site.
  • Custom fields. I would love to have the ability to add custom fields to the interface. I do realize this introduces many levels of difficulty (and I realize that it is quite easy to hack the software to add them if necessary).

All-in-all, Movabletye 3.2 greatly extends the functionality of the software. While I have always preferred Movabletype to the competitors, these new features only reinforce my belief that Movabletype is the best blogging package available.

September 07, 2005

My favorite class in high school was Latin. Strange choice, is it not? The reason I so loved the class was that the teacher, Dr. Helder, formed the lessons in such a way that he made a dead language come alive. He showed us how Latin is alive and well in many areas of our culture, either in terminology or in the roots of other languages. I think he touched on an important principle - that for teaching to be interesting it must also be shown to be relevant.

Theology can often seem abstract and uninteresting. You may remember the article I posted a couple of months ago in which I discussed the doctrine of Open Theism. I said “What began on the fringes of scholarship has quickly gained a popular following, in part because of the publication of entry-level titles such as Gregory Boyd’s God of the Possible and in part because of the acceptance of the doctrine by various popular authors.” The first point I made about Open Theism is “God’s greatest attribute is love. God’s love so overshadows His other characteristics that He could never allow or condone evil or suffering to befall mankind.” If you have not read the article, you may wish to do so. Click here.

This morning I found an example of this teaching in action, and thought I would share it to prove that we need to understand Open Theism so we can call it for what it is. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina some of the adherents to this doctrine have stepped forward to espouse such false teaching. Perhaps the most blatant attack on the traditional, biblical view of God has been launched by Tony Campolo, a man who has been teaching dangerous doctrine for many years now. To see that he believes in Open Theism we need look no further than the title of his article: “Katrina: Not God’s Wrath—or His Will.” Here are a few quotes:

“Unfortunately, there are a lot of bad answers. One such answer is that somehow all suffering is a part of God’s great plan. In the midst of agonies, someone is likely to quote from the Bible, telling us that if we would just be patient, we eventually would see “all things work together for the good, for those who love God, and are called according to His purposes.” (Romans 8:28)”

“Perhaps we would do well to listen to the likes of Rabbi Harold Kushner, who contends that God is not really as powerful as we have claimed. Nowhere in the Hebrew Scriptures does it say that God is omnipotent. Kushner points out that omnipotence is a Greek philosophical concept, but it is not in his Bible. Instead, the Hebrew Bible contends that God is mighty. That means that God is a greater force in the universe than all the other forces combined.”

He concludes by saying, “Instead of looking for God in the earthquake or the tsunami, in the roaring forest fires blazing in the western states, or in the mighty winds of Katrina, it would be best to seek out a quiet place and heed the promptings of God’s still small voice. That voice will inspire us to bring some of God’s goodness to bear in the lives of those who suffer.”

This it outright, blatant heresy. It is unbiblical and dangerous. Avoid this man and his teaching! You can read the complete article here.

September 07, 2005

This is the fourth article in a series about Mark Driscoll’s book The Radical Reformission. You can find the first article here and the second here and the third here. We are progressing through the book and have arrived at a chapter in which Driscoll begins to apply his understanding of culture and reformission. This chapter, entitled “going to seminary at the grocery store” has the more helpful subtitle, “connecting with culture in reformission.” Driscoll begins by providing an example of a cultural disconnect, recounting a time he went to India and was unable to communicate with the people from that culture, not because they are deaf or stupid, but because they speak a different language.

The discussion inevitably turns to Paul at Mars Hill in Athens. Driscoll explains how Paul courageously stood before the Areopagus to proclaim the gospel, “beginning by respectfully establishing common ground with his hearers so he could work from their culture to the Scriptures” (page 119). Using the altar to the unknown God as his metaphor, Paul shared the gospel with these men. He also took spiritual concepts from popular poetry and showed how concepts had been applied to Zeus that in reality needed to be applied to Jesus. “In our day, this would be akin to unearthing partial truths about God from a culture’s film, music, comedy, sports, literature, theatre, philosophy, economics, medicine or politics, and working from those truths to the truth of Jesus as the ultimate answer to all human questions and cultural problems” (page 121).

Driscoll moves on to repent of bad theology, stating that “while some Christians lament the condition of our spiritual but post-Christian nation, reformission sees our day as a great opportunity for the gospel” (page 122). But errors in Christian theology keep people from seeing the bountiful opportunities presented in popular music, film and other cultural outlets. Driscoll provides three common myths that hinder reformission.

Culture and worldiness - Wordliness, according to Driscoll, is “the collective sinfulness that flows from human hearts to pollute God’s good creation” (page 123). Christians, of course, are commanded throughout the New Testament to flee worldiness. “Tragically, I have seen many young pastors undertake reformission without a wise understanding of worldliness, pastors who, rather than converting lost people, were themselves converted and are no longer pastors but instead are adulterers, divorcees, alcoholics, perverts, homosexuals, feminists and nut jobs. Most frightening of all are the pastors who have become worldy but remain pastors who preach a gospel that cannot save because it is little more than the hollow echo of a cursed world” (page 124). While worldliness is to be avoided, we must not make it synonymous with culture, for this is a sure-fire way of killing reformission. Every culture has within it those good bits of creation and we must seek those out in order to reach lost people.

Garbage in, Garbage out - I assume all Christians have heard this little phrase which supposedly was coined by computer programmers. It is used most often with music to explain to young people that what they put into their minds will inevitably effect what comes out of their lives. However, says Driscoll, this has several problems. First, no culture is untainted by sin and sinners, including Christian culture. Second, there is no clear division between Christian and secular entertainment. Third, it assumes that what Christians see and hear, they will want to participate in. All of these, says Driscoll, show that we cannot adhere to a “garbage in, garbage out” mentality. As we engage culture we must use discernment, but still “watch films, listen to music, read books, watch television, shop at stores, and engage in other activies as theologians and missionaries filled with wisdom and discernment, seeking to better grasp life in our Mars Hill” (page 127).

Builders, Boomers, and Busters - Driscoll objects to dividing people into generations as if we can make rash assumptions about people based on age. He objects to churches that reach out to “booomers,” for examples, assuming that all boomers are the same.

He wraps up this section by stating, “Now that we have some of our theology of culture in order, we are ready to follow in Paul’s footsteps and walk around our Athens searching for reformission clues” (page 129). He begins this work by recounting the story of Daniel, who seemed to participate in Babylonian culture, yet remained distinct and strong in his beliefs. Like Daniel, we are in cultural captivity. “Do you spot the parallels to our situation? God desires to bless all nations and cultures of the earth through us, and so he has sent us into exile in places and among peoples no less strange or lost than the Babylonians” (page 131).

Thoughts

It is clear that Driscoll has been building towards this chapter. Without having read beyond this point, I am assuming that in the following chapters he will continue to build his case for cultural immersion. I am glad that Driscoll sees the challenge presented by worldliness. Further, he sees the danger of it, not only for what it can do to an individual, but what it can do to the gospel. A worldly gospel, as Driscoll shows, is no gospel at all.

But where I still have a disconnect from Driscoll is in his neat line dividing worldiness (which he says is bad) from culture (which he feels is inherently good but has been corrupted by humans). While he has done much to provide a theology of culture, his theology of worldliness leaves much to be desired. His definition of worldliness, “the collective sinfulness that flows from human hearts to pollute God’s good creation,” seems incomplete. Joel Beeke defines it as follows: “Worldiness, then, is human nature without God. Someone who is of the world is controlled by worldly pursuits: the quest for pleasure, profit and position. A worldly man yields to the spirit of fallen mankind - the spirit of self-seeking and self-indulgence - without regard for God. Each one of us, by nature, was born worldly. We belong to this world; it is our natural habitat” (Overcoming the World, page 16). The spirit of self-indulgence in Beeke’s definition seems absent from Driscoll’s, and in fact, seems to be a part of his pursuit of cultural relevance. I believe Beeke is also correct when he says, “Overcoming also doesn’t mean sanctifying everything in the world for Christ. Some parts of the world may be redeemed for Christ, but sinful activities can never be sanctified” (page 17). Again, this seems absent from Driscoll’s definition, and indeed it must be, since he insists that culture is good in and of itself.

It is almost as if Driscoll believes that any cultural pursuit is permissible unless I allow it to impact me in a negative, ungodly way. Hence Driscoll can visit a gay bar with a friend. Because he does not condone the activities within that bar and does not participate in the revelry, it is a neutral and even a good pursuit for him. The same can be said of film and music. Watching movies and television shows, even if they dishonor God, is a useful pursuit as it allows the Christian to pick out the redeeming aspects and use those to build bridges to the culture. But I do not find this in Scripture. Jesus was a friend to sinners, but he never participated in their sin. Jesus spoke to prositututes, but He did not visit brothels. Jesus may have befriended homosexuals, but I doubt he would have walked into a bathhouse.

And what of the people within a culture? Do they not laugh at Christians who willingly participate in their sinful activities? Unbelievers are adept at noticing and proclaiming the inconsistencies between what Christians believe and what they do - between the talk and the walk. When we watch movies filled with despicable content, do they not notice this and marvel that we would set foot in a theatre to watch such things? While we may do it under the banner of understanding culture, they see it and understand it as being inconsistent with the teachings of Jesus.

To summarize, I have a growing concern that Driscoll’s reformission is built, at least in part, on a permissive spirit that will eventually lead to the very thing it is supposed to avoid. Could it be that those pastors who were led into all manner of worldliness were led there not by poor discernment, but by immersing themselves in cultural pursuits that stand at odds with God’s standards?

This series will continue soon.

September 04, 2005

I am in a reflective mood today and since I have been experiencing one of those frustrating times with my children began to think about what it means to be a child of God. I was reminded of an article I wrote a couple of years ago and decided to resurrect it, editing it and adding to it a little bit.

Being a parent is such a profound experience. My children make me want to laugh and cry. They will fill me with love at times and with frustration at other times. I have learned so much about myself and about human nature through being a parent. But that is not all. Parenthood has also taught me so much about God and why He refers to Himself as my Father.

God is patient. Parenthood is a constant battle of my patience. My children love to test me – pushing to see just how far they can go. They want to know exactly what obedience means and where the line is that distinguishes obedience from disobedience. If I need patience with my children, imagine the patience God requires to put up with me. I also like to push against the line or cross it altogether. Yet God patiently stays with me, never deserting me.

God loves. I love my children more than I can express. The Bible says that the measure of the deepest kind of love is that a man would lay down his life for one he loves. I would without hesitation trade my life for my children’s lives. Occasionally I will read of a parent who lost his life trying to save his child from a burning building, and I marvel at his courage, yet understand how it would be easier to die trying than to regret never attempting to save that child. God loves with a perfect love. God loved me even while I hated Him and while I did all I could to show Him how much I hated Him. But God did more than love me when I hated Him. He also suffered and died for me. What awesome love!

God loves equally. I love my children equally. I could never choose one over the other. They are both equally the apple of my eye. God also believes in equality. There is not another of His children in the world that God loves more than me and there is not another one He loves less than me.

God loves distinctly. While I love my children equally, I love each one in different ways. As I consider how I love my children I am reminded of Revelation 2:17. “To the one who conquers I will give some of the hidden manna, and I will give him a white stone, with a new name written on the stone that no one knows except the one who receives it.” Jesus loves us all equally, yet He loves each of us in a way that takes note of what distinguishes us from each other.

God teaches. Children are ridiculous. Only in a household containing children would you expect to hear commands like “don’t eat food that’s been in the toilet!” and “take that straw out of your sister’s nose!” Children have no common sense and have to learn so many lessons either by being told by their parents or by experiencing pain. And isn’t that the way I am? I can learn God’s ways from the Bible or from others who have already walked life’s pathway before me, but more often I prefer to learn by trying things out. I am then left to deal with the often-painful consequences of my actions.

God laughs. Children are hilarious. The things my kids say and the things they do keep me laughing. How can you help but laugh when your two-year old son imitate the pastor’s prayer by saying, “Dear God. Blah blah blah blah blah. Amen.” When my children laugh and play together, I laugh with them. Similarly God must laugh when He sees me blunder through life and must laugh with me when I am simply laughing out of the enjoyment life.

God cares. There are few things I care about more than my children and their well-being. I cry with my children – I feel what my children feel. When my daughter hurts herself, I feel her pain. When my son gets bullied, it makes me angry. God feels my pain and He burns with anger against those who come against me. He wants nothing but the best for me.

God provides. My children trust me to provide. When my son is hungry he asks for a snack. He never considers that perhaps it is actually my will to keep him hungry. He trusts that I can afford to buy him snacks. He has blind faith in my ability to provide. And so I can trust that not only can God provide, but also that it is His will and his desire to provide for me. “What father among you, if his son asks for[a] a fish, will instead of a fish give him a serpent; or if he asks for an egg, will give him a scorpion? If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!” (Luke Luke 11:10-13).

When we look at such a list, is it any wonder that God calls Himself my Father? Is it any wonder that He chooses to reveal Himself to us in such an intimate, familiar way?

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