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sovereignty

January 12, 2012

A couple of days ago my Bible reading took me to Acts 9, the story of the conversion of Saul. You know how it goes I’m sure. Paul, a vicious enemy of the early church, is on his way to from Jerusalem to Damascus so he can begin a whole new wave of persecution against the Christians there. But somewhere between the cities a sudden light shines from heaven and Saul has an unexpected encounter with Jesus. Jesus told him to continue on his way to Damascus and to wait to be told what he must do.

Paul obeys and continues to Damascus, blind now, and having to be led all the way. For three days the blindness continues and for those three days he fasts from all food and drink.

As Paul waits, prays and fasts, we are introduced to a disciple named Ananias. The Lord appears to him in a vision and tells him to go to Saul and to heal his eyes by laying hands on him. I’ve always gotten a strange joy out of Ananias’ “Um…God” moment. Having been told to go and visit this man Saul, this man whose name is synonymous with persecution, Ananias seems to say, “Um…I know you’re omniscient and all, but maybe you haven’t heard about this Saul guy. So let me tell you about him…” (I’ve written about this here)

Eventually faith and reason prevail. Ananias finds the place Paul is staying and goes on in to see him. And as I read (actually, listened to) the account this time two words stood out to me: “Brother Saul.” Ananias enters that house, lays his hands on Saul and says, “Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus who appeared to you on the road by which you came has sent me so that you may regain your sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit.”

August 14, 2007

Excerpted from Jim Andrew’s Polishing God’s Monuments.

When the Lord’s ways do not neatly conform to our pat little paradigms of what seems (to our fallible minds) right and just, and good and faithful, it says something about human nature that usually the first thought that comes to mind is that something is wrong with God. Somehow the last thing that occurs to us is that God is simply too big for our small boxes. It is imperative at such times that we learn to be humble, not haughty. God always deserves the benefit of the doubt. And, faith always pleads with us, “Dear soul, trust in God’s power, trust God’s wisdom, trust God’s goodness, trust God’s faithfulness—even though to your mixed-up, emotionally over-charged mind he doesn’t seem to be living up to his resume or promises. Just do it anyways.

Christian common sense should also remind us that divine revelation is always a far more reliable barometer of reality that our personal perceptions, distorted as they are by how we think a moral and upright God is obliged to behave in this situation or that. Friends, my advice is this: discount personal feelings—rest in the biblical facts. Don’t always be awash in how things seem; anchor your faith on how divine revelation says they are. Never allow blind emotions to float you off into the open sea of doubt.

With that adjustment, one can trust his goodness even when God may not seem to be good; one can trust his wisdom even when he may not seem to be wise; one can trust he is acting in character even when he may not seem to be measuring up to his own revealed profile; one can trust his power even when it seems he is weak; one can trust his faithfulness even when it seems he is not being faithful.


This book, dealing with “pillars of hope for punishing times” and telling the story of grace through almost inconceivable suffering is available from Amazon.

September 12, 2005

Humility True GreatnessI’ve often wondered how I missed out on C.J. Mahaney’s books for so long. While I’ve now read several of them, I did not read the first until earlier this year. And now I’m hooked. I love Mahaney’s style of writing in which he blends sound, biblical teaching with humility and just the right amount of humor. I’ve found his books to be practical, yet not legislative, as if we needed him to dictate every aspect of the reader’s life. I was excited, then, to be given a sneak-peek at his upcoming title, Humility: True Greatness. What follows is a short preview of this book, due for release next month.

Preview

There is a certain irony in the pursuit of humility. We see a glimpse of that in the title of this book, Humility: True Greatness. Humility is true greatness. The pursuit of humility and the pursuit of greatness are one and the same, provided that we seek greatness as defined by the Creator. I have never met C.J. Mahaney (though hope to some day), but from all accounts he is well-qualified to write a book on such a difficult subject. And this is a difficult topic. After all, how can a person write a book on humility without sounding like he feels he is most qualified? The truth is he can, provided he uses the Scripture as the foundation for his teaching. And that is exactly what Mahaney does.

The book is divided into three sections. Part one deals with the battle of humility versus pride, part two with our Savior and the secret of true greatness and part three with the practice of true humility.

In the first part, Mahaney defines humility and shows how true humility is nothing less than a battle against the pride that lives deep within every heart. “Humility is honestly assessing ourselves in the light of God’s holiness and our sinfulness.” These two realities must be the foundation of any definition of humility: our sinfulness and God’s holiness. This is precisely why true greatness can only be achieved by followers of Jesus Christ, for only they have had their eyes opened by the Holy Spirit to see the depth of their own depravity and the overwhelming holiness of God.

Mahaney teaches, rightly I believe, that God hates the sin of pride above all other sin. This is a sin that plagues all humans, though it manifests itself in different ways. So the issue facing the believer is he examines his life is not if pride is present, but where it is present. For most of us it is deeply ingrained in our lives and only a great amount of Spirit-guided self-examination can draw it to the surface.

In the second part, Mahaney defines greatness as Jesus did, showing that being great means being a servant to everyone. Just as Jesus came to serve, so must we serve with our lives. Christ lived as the perfect example of humble service. As in all his books, Mahaney leads the reader to the cross, stating that apart from Christ’s sacrifice, there is no serving. We can only attain true greatness by emulating Christ’s example - the example that led him to the cross where He made the greatest sacrifice.

In the third and final part of the book Mahaney builds on the foundation he has built through Scripture to provide advice on the practice of humility. This is far more than a bullet list of do’s and don’ts. It is far more than a false, monastic humility that is really no humility at all. Instead, he examines several different areas of life and shows how humility can be applied to all of them. From the moment we wake up to the moment we fall asleep (and even while we are asleep) we can practice humility. Whether we experience joy or pain, whether we are correcting or being corrected, we all have opportunities to practice humility every day.

Humility: True Greatness is a truly great book. I do not know of a person who shows no pride in his life, and thus I do not know of a person who would not benefit from reading it. I highly and unreservedly recommend this book. I pray that it will be widely-read, that humility may be widely-practiced.

What Others Are Saying

Here are some endorsements written by men who are far more discerning (and, in all likelihood, far more humble) than I am.

“This is the right book from the right man at the right time. More than any other man I have known, C. J. Mahaney has taught me what humility really is. This is a man whose humility is a gift to the entire church. He knows that humility is strength, and that God uses the humble in a powerful way. He understands the danger of pride, and calls us all to aspire to a legacy of greatness-a greatness that shows the entire world the glory of God. He points us to a cross-centered worldview that will transform every dimension of life.”
-R. Albert Mohler, Jr.

“God hates it. The Bible is pretty clear on that fact. Yet, our culture exalts it. For many people, if not most, pride is seen as a virtue. We are expected to be proud of ourselves, our accomplishments, our looks, our possessions, our family, our friends. We are to call attention to whom we know, what we’ve done, where we’ve been. We are to promote ourselves and anything associated with us. We’re even encouraged to apply bumper stickers that proclaim the superiority of our child over the less gifted children at school.

Perhaps the most prideful are those who express a supposed humility, and yet take pride in their excellent character. An even more subtle example is the individual who is devastated by the reality of personal failure (this is actually self-love…he is simply shocked at seeing himself as he really is).

It’s all pride. And God’s hatred of it, whether subtle or overt, will never change.

We need to be reminded daily that God is opposed to the proud. We need to be told once again what greatness is in the eyes of God. This is important for God’s leaders in the church, for His leaders in families, and for anyone who desires to live a life of excellence that is pleasing to Him.

I am grateful for C.J. Mahaney’s honest and accurate treatment of this ‘accepted’ sin. Let the truth that is explained in this book break you of pride and reap within you the pleasing aroma of humility. God not only is opposed to the proud, but He exalts the humble.”
-John MacArthur

“My friend C.J. Mahaney tackles a subject of immense importance. Since God opposes the proud and gives grace to the humble, what could be more important than understanding and developing true humility, as a lightning rod for grace? C. J.’s book is biblical, honest and full of helpful insights. We need less egomania and more humility and servanthood in our churches today. May God use this book to remind us that ‘only the humble are sane.’”
-Randy Alcorn

“This is a wonderful, sobering, humbling, God-centered, Bible-based book on humility by an author who truly exemplifies it in his own life. I especially appreciated Mahaney’s suggestions for practical disciplines to help us cultivate humility before God. This book’s message will tend to keep us and our churches from self-destruction due to pride, will make us thankful for little blessings in everyday life, and will bring us closer to God.”
-Wayne Grudem

“Humility is seldom thought about in our Christian community. In his masterful way, C.J. Mahaney gives us a much-needed wake-up call on this important subject. I highly recommend this book.”
-Jerry Bridges

Content

Foreword by Joshua Harris
 Introduction

PART I
OUR GREATEST FRIEND, OUR GREATEST ENEMY
The Battle of Humility Versus Pride

CHAPTER 1
The Promise of Humility

CHAPTER 2
The Perils of Pride

PART II
THE GREAT REVERSAL
Our Savior and the Secret of True Greatness

CHAPTER 3
Greatness Redefined

CHAPTER 4
Greatness Demonstrated

PART III
OUR GREAT PURSUIT
The Practice of True Humility

CHAPTER 5
As Each Day Begins

CHAPTER 6
As Each Day Ends

CHAPTER 7
For Special Focus

CHAPTER 8
Identifying Evidences of Grace

CHAPTER 9
Encouraging Others

CHAPTER 10
Inviting and Pursuing Correction

CHAPTER 11
Responding Humbly to Trials

CHAPTER 12
A Legacy of Greatness

A Final Word

How to Weaken Pride and Cultivate Humility:
A List of Suggestions

Conclusion

Humility: True Greatness is a wonderful book and one I highly recommend. In fact, it is one of the best, most practical books I have read all year long and my favorite of Mahaney’s books. I cannot think of a person who would not benefit from it.

Availability

The book is being published by Multnomah Publishers and is set to be released on October 23. It is currently available for pre-order from Amazon (and it’s only $10, too!).