Welcome to the online home of Tim Challies, blogger, author, and book reviewer.

Tim Challies

Challies on FacebookChallies on Twitter

Sponsored

April 04, 2016

This sponsored post was prepared by Zondervan and Nabeel Qureshi.

QureshiNABEEL QURESHI is the New York Times bestselling author of Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus. His latest book, Answering Jihad, released earlier this month and provides a personal, challenging, and respectful answer to the many questions surrounding jihad, the rise of ISIS, and Islamic terrorism. Last week, his USA Today op-ed was one of the most read and shared articles following the attack on Brussels.

Q: Tell me about your reasons for writing Answering Jihad.

 NABEEL: My primary purpose in writing Answering Jihad was to respond to the present climate of confusion in the West. Terrorist attacks occur continuously, and yet our Muslim neighbors whom we know to be kind insist that Islam is a religion of peace. How can we understand this apparent contradiction? Is Islam truly a religion of peace, and if not, why do our Muslim neighbors keep telling us it is? The book is not intended to be a detailed treatise on jihad, but a necessary first step in responding to the present crisis of Islamic violence that I do not think will stop. It is my prayer, as the U.S. and other nations seek a way out of the current confusion and begins to answer jihad, that this book points a better way forward.

Q: You tell the story of your conversion from Islam in your memoir Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus. Now that you are a Christian, how did you approach writing this book? 

NABEEL: Writing the book, I wanted to make sure that I accurately depicted the feelings and beliefs of Western Muslims so that I could write a book that would be informative to them as well as to Westerners at large. In order to do that, I had to revisit how I felt as a Muslim investigating jihad for the first time; I truly was shocked when I discovered for the first time that the foundations of Islam were indeed quite violent, contrary to what I had been taught about “the religion of peace.”

What was particularly difficult was trying to walk the line of sharing this truth about Islam while conveying my heartfelt belief that people should be compassionate towards Muslims. If we overemphasize one aspect, it could appear that we are neglecting the other. In today’s polarized political and social climates, people are staking their positions on either tolerance or truth, but rarely both. I cannot afford to compromise either; my country is under attack by jihad, yet my family remains Muslim. 

Q: As a child, you grew up in a Muslim home with several family members having served in the U.S. Military. What values did that ingrain in you?

Answering JihadNABEEL: Our allegiance was to God and country; we were Muslim, first and foremost. As with Americans of other religious backgrounds, our faith was in no way exclusive of our devotion to our nation. According to my parents’ teaching, it was Islam that commanded me to love and serve my country. Islam taught me to defend the oppressed, to stand up for the rights of women and children, to shun the desires of the flesh, to seek the pleasure of God, and to enjoin the good and forbid the evil. By my teenage years I enthusiastically proclaimed Islam to all who would listen, and I usually started by informing them of a teaching that was knit into the fiber of my beliefs: Islam is the religion of peace.

Q: But then September 11, 2001 comes along. How did that change your thoughts on jihad?

NABEEL: On September 11, I was confronted for the first time with the stark reality of jihad. It was not as if I had never heard of jihad before; I certainly had, but I knew it as a defensive effort buried deep in the pages of Islamic history. That is how our imams alluded to jihad, and we never questioned it. As American Muslims we rarely, if ever, thought about jihad. When the twin towers fell, the eyes of the nation turned to American Muslims for an explanation. I sincerely believe September 11 was a greater shock for American Muslims like my family than for the average American. Not only did we newly perceive our lack of security from jihadists, as did everyone else, we also faced a latent threat of retaliation from would-be vigilantes. It felt as if we were hemmed in on all sides. In the midst of this, while mourning our fallen compatriots and considering our own security, we had to defend the faith we knew and loved. We had to assure everyone that Islam was a religion of peace, just as we had always known. I remember hearing a slogan at my mosque that I shared with many: “The terrorists who hijacked the planes on September 11 also hijacked Islam.”

Q: This led you to studying the history of Islam, in which you discovered a lot of violence in what you were taught was the “religion of peace.” How did you respond to that?

NABEEL: After years of investigation, I had to face the reality. There is a great deal of violence in Islam, even in the very foundations of the faith, and it is not all defensive. Quite to the contrary, if the traditions about the prophet of Islam are in any way reliable, then Islam glorifies violent jihad arguably more than any other action a Muslim can take. This conclusion led me to a three-pronged fork in the road. Either I could become an apostate and leave Islam, grow apathetic and ignore the prophet, or become “radicalized” and obey him. The alternative of simply disregarding Muhammad’s teachings and continuing as a devout Muslim was not an option in my mind, nor is it for most Muslims, since to be Muslim is to submit to Allah and to follow Muhammad. Apostasy, apathy, or radicalization; those were my choices.

Q: You make a point of drawing a distinction between Islam and Muslims. Why is that important?

NABEEL: Especially because of the great diversity of Islamic expression, it bears repeating that Islam is not Muslims, and Muslims are not Islam. Though Muslims are adherents of Islam, and Islam is the worldview of Muslims, the two are not the same, as too many uncritically want to believe. On one end of the spectrum, many assume that if the Quran teaches something then all Muslims believe it. That is false. Many Muslims have not heard of a given teaching, some might interpret it differently, and others may frankly do their best to ignore it. For example, even if we were to demonstrate through careful hermeneutics that the Quranic injunction to beat disobedient wives (4:34) is meant to apply to all Muslims today, it would still have zero bearing in my family. My father will not beat my mother. On the other end of the spectrum, criticism of Islam is often taken to be criticism of Muslims. That is equally false. One can criticize the Quranic command to beat disobedient wives without criticizing Muslims. Islam is not Muslims, and one can criticize Islam while affirming and loving Muslims.

 Q: Why do you say that the idea of jihad has violent roots in Islam?

Qureshi QuoteNABEEL: Although the average American Muslim agrees that the Quran and hadith are the ultimate basis of their faith, many have not critically read either and would be surprised to find violent, offensive jihad shot through the foundations of Islam. The Quranic revelations reflect the development in Muhammad’s life as he moved from a peaceful trajectory to a violent one, culminating in surah 9 of the Quran, chronologically the last major chapter of the Quran and its most expansively violent teaching. Surah 9 is a command to disavow all treaties with polytheists and to subjugate Jews and Christians so that Islam may “prevail over every faith.” The scope of violence has no clear limits, so it’s fair to wonder whether any non-Muslims in the world are immune from being attacked, subdued, or assimilated under this command. Muslims must fight, according to this final surah of the Quran, and if they do not, then their faith is called into question and they are counted among the hypocrites. If they do fight, they are promised one of two rewards, either spoils of war or heaven through martyrdom. Allah has made a bargain with the mujahid who obeys: Kill or be killed in battle, and paradise awaits.

Q: What is the relationship between Islamic and Christian views of Jesus, specifically in terms of violence?

NABEEL: Jesus is surprisingly prominent in Islamic eschatology. In common Muslim views of the end-times, he personally wages war on behalf of Muslims, breaking all the crosses and killing all the swine. In this war Muslims will kill Jews and defeat them, and Jesus will destroy the anti-Christ for their sake. By contrast, in Christianity, Jesus shows Christians how to answer persecution with love. Although this suggestion might seem impossible to some and ridiculous to others, Jesus’s teachings were always radical, and they are only possible to follow if the gospel message is true. If we will live eternally with God in bliss, then we can lay down this life to love even our enemies. In the face of jihad, the Christian Jesus teaches his followers to respond with love.

Q: What do you think is the best way we should answer jihad?

NABEEL: By being proactive, not reactive. It means living life with people who might be different from us. It means stepping out of our comfort zone and loving people unconditionally, perhaps even loving our enemies. We need something that breaks the cycle, and I think that can only be love. Not love as wistfully envisioned by teenagers and songwriters, but love as envisioned by Jesus, a decision to put the needs and concerns of others above our own, even at the cost of our own.

My suggestion is that we engage Muslims proactively with love and friendship while simultaneously acknowledging the truth about Islam. This is not the final step in answering jihad, but it is the correct first step, and it offers a better way forward.

**Learn more at AnsweringJihad.com or download a free chapter here.**

March 28, 2016

This sponsored post was prepared by Scott Christensen, author of What About Free Will?

Trying to grasp the theological conundrum of God’s sovereignty and human free will is like pitting Batman against Superman. A standoff seems inevitable. Surely one of the two must be sacrificed.

March 21, 2016

This sponsored post was provided by Tabletalk magazine.

1) Regard your Muslim friend as an individual who is in as much need of salvation as any other human being, including you. Every nonbeliever must be seen as a divine appointment sent to us by God. While some will not respond, others will come to faith in Christ. The Word of God says, “We are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us” (2 Cor. 5:20).

2) Make an effort to cultivate a genuine friendship with your Muslim neighbor and learn about his or her background.

3) Show genuine Christian love in word and deed. One of my favorite missionaries to Muslims, who was martyred for his faith, is Raymond Lull. He traveled to North Africa during the bitter days of the Crusades and understood that the only way to overcome hostile attitudes on both sides was to demonstrate the greatest Christian weapon: the love of God. He said, “He that loves not lives not, and he that lives by ‘The Life’ cannot die.” To Muslims he declared, “I come to meet the Muslims not with arms, but with words; not by force, but by reason, in both testaments. From the beginning, God promised the coming of the Messiah.Table talk

Sign up for a 3-month trial to Tabletalk magazine and receive a free teaching series CD on Islam.

4) Anticipate questions, inquiries, and objections to the unique teaching of the Bible. These must be explained in accordance with the teaching of the Bible. Be patient, ready to answer your Muslim friend’s objections as Christ did in His encounter with Nicodemus and the Samaritan woman (John 3–4).

5) Don’t denigrate your Muslim friend’s faith. When Christ—the “bright morning star” (Rev. 22:16)—radiates, He will eliminate all shadows.

6) Introduce the life, teaching, and ministry of Christ. He is highly revered and exalted in Islam. The majority of Muslim converts testify that the most influential factor in their conversion was their exposure to the true words and life of Christ.

7) Introduce your friend to the Bible. The Word of God is the greatest tool for evangelizing Muslims. We must be encouraged by God’s promise: “So shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and shall succeed in the thing for which I sent it” (Isa. 55:11).

8) If appropriate, share your personal testimony, and saturate it with the truth of Scripture. Underscore the crucial difference between being a legalistic person and being radically changed by the life, teaching, and power of Christ. Paul’s testimony in Philippians 3 is a profound example of this transformation.

9) Avoid using theological terms that are foreign to your Muslim friend. But if you must use them, try to clarify their meanings and emphasize their implications for salvation.

10) Introduce your Muslim friend to your pastor, and invite him to worship with you. Trust the Holy Spirit to bring the lost sheep into the fold.

This excerpt is from Bassam Chedid’s contribution to the April issue of Tabletalk magazine. Click here to read it in full. Each month, Tabletalk features articles from trusted Christian authors and teachers, daily devotionals, and a companion digital edition. Request your free 3-month trial today and receive a complimentary copy of The Dark Side of Islam, a teaching series CD from R.C. Sproul and former Muslim, Abdul Saleeb.

March 14, 2016

This sponsored post was prepared by The Master’s College.

We give the Scripture supreme place because it honors the lordship of Christ over His Church. I’m always concerned when I go to churches or when I hear about churches where the Word of God is not taught, where Scripture is not exposited, where the whole counsel of God is not declared, because what is happening in that church is a mutiny. It is a usurpation of the authority of God and the headship of Jesus Christ over His church. 

I am an under-shepherd; I have one responsibility and that is to say to my people what the Head of the Church has revealed. My responsibility, then, is to acknowledge Jesus Christ and His dominant rule over His church, exercising that rule through the Truth that comes in the pages of the New Testament. All the issues of life are addressed through the revelation the Lord of the Church has given us in the New Testament. All Christian life, all Christian growth flows out of an understanding and an application of that revelation. All meaning in life, all purpose is found in obeying the Lord of the Church. 

The Word of God, then, prevails over our whole lives. There is no such thing as a “secular” component in your life; it does not exist. You are no part of secular things, you are no part of ungodly things, and you have no part in worldly things. All that you do, all that you are, all that you have, that you hope for belongs to the Lord of the Church who has purchased you with His own blood.

 (Adapted from “The Supreme Place of Scripture,” delivered by John MacArthur to the students of The Master’s College on September 8, 2003.)

“…do all to the glory of God” (emphasis added).

When Paul wrote 1 Corinthians 10:31, he didn’t include any caveats or exceptions. Thus, secular academics simply don’t exist at The Master’s College. Our faculty and staff firmly believe that every vocation and career fall within the Lord’s headship over believers and His Church. And, our classes affirm the authority of Christ’s Word over every academic discipline, from biology to business to computer science to communication. 

We are excited to now offer that same education to believers around the world through TMC Online. Four programs are currently available: Bachelor of Arts degrees in Biblical Studies, Christian Ministries, and Organizational Management, and a Master of Business Administration degree.

Two additional degree programs are also in the works. A B.A. in Biblical Counseling and an M.A. in Biblical Studies are scheduled to begin accepting students this summer, pending approval by the WASC Senior College and University Commission.

And if you’re not planning to earn a full degree, check out our variety of general education, dual credit and noncredit options, including the ever-popular Land of the Bible class, taught by one of our world-renowned professors in the land of Israel. Available on a convenient USB flash drive as part of our Biblical Equipping Collection, the course includes 30 hours of lectures and reproducible resources that are perfect for a Bible study setting.

As a community of believers passionate about living under the headship of Christ, we at The Master’s College are eager to serve the Church through quality education across a variety of disciplines. Don’t miss your chance to learn how the Bible applies to all of life, because for the Christian, “secular” does not exist.

Contact TMC Online

Phone: 877-302-3337
Email: tmconline@masters.edu
Website: www.masters.edu/academics/online
Facebook: www.facebook.com/themasterscollege/
Twitter: www.twitter.com/masterscollege

March 07, 2016

This sponsored post was prepared by D.A. Horton, author of Bound to be Free.

Bound to be FreeI have lived a good portion of my life in what I call the “performance trap”. I used to feel that I would never be good enough to receive the love of God. Every waking hour I felt a sense of guilt because I thought I was frustrating God with my lackluster performance. To deal with the guilt, I would either work tirelessly for God’s affection or I would shut down completely because I was tired of failing time and time again.

But life inside of the trap of God’s grace is the opposite. In the trap of grace, we start to realize that whether we make mistakes or obey God perfectly, He still loves us the same. During our entire process of growing, He never removes one ounce of His affection from us!

Breakfast in bed

Having children has helped me understand on a finite level the Father’s love for me. Let me give you an example. One time when I was sleeping in, my daughter Izabelle wanted to surprise Elicia and me with breakfast in bed. After she made toast and diced up fresh fruit, she pulled orange juice out the refrigerator and attempted to pour it into small porcelain teacups.

When she tried pouring the juice into the teacups, somehow her hand slipped and she spilled the juice all over the kitchen table. The scurrying of little feet in the kitchen aroused my curiosity, and I rose out of the bed to head downstairs. I found Izabelle hiding behind a mountain of soggy paper towels in the kitchen. I called out for her, and at first she didn’t answer. Once again I called out for her by name, and this time all she did was begin to cry out loud.

God’s love for me does not increase when I do right, or decrease when I do wrong.

I walked over to her and gave her a hug, which made her start crying harder! Befuddled, I asked her what was wrong. “I just wanted to surprise you by making breakfast for you,” she said, “and I spilled the orange juice and made a mistake and couldn’t clean it up before you came into the kitchen.” Seeing that her heart was broken, I looked her in the eyes and said, “Baby girl, it was just a mistake. Everything is fine. Now, let’s both clean up this mess.” Her tears stopped as I began to wipe them away. We cleaned up the mess and enjoyed a nice meal together, just the two of us.

That moment will forever be etched in my mind because I realized—that’s how my loving heavenly Father responds to me when I make an honest mistake or even blatantly disobey Him. God’s love for me does not increase when I do right or decrease when I do wrong. As Jude informs us, those who are “loved by God the Father” are being “kept by Jesus Christ” (v. 1). What a power-packed verse!

We are loved by God and kept in Christ!

Jude wrote the two verbs loved and kept in the perfect tense and passive voice. This tense and voice assures us that at some point in eternity past God began to love us, and His love for us from that point throughout all of eternity will remain steady, unwavering, and unconditional. In addition, because it is passive, I constantly receive His affection with every breath that I breathe, and I do not have to work for it!

God articulates this liberating truth to His children throughout the New Testament. He loves us before, during, and after we make our sinful and honest mistakes. And just like my daughter when she heard me coming into the kitchen, we naturally try to hide from our Father out of embarrassment when we make a mistake. Yet, when we look at the reality of 1 John 1:8-10, we are confronted by the fact that because of the person and work of Jesus, we who have embraced Him as Savior can go to God directly and lay our sins before Him. He is both faithful and just to forgive us.

Learn more about Bound to be Free.

Bound to be Free

February 29, 2016

This sponsored post was prepared by The Master’s College.

In discussing hermeneutics (or the study of how we interpret the Bible), the following example comes to my mind. On March 10, a friend of mine opened up his calendar. He has one of these devotional calendars that gives you an inspirational thought for the day, and the meditation for that morning came from Luke 4. 

It said, “If you worship me, all will be yours.” 

That sounds really encouraging—a little bit shallow, but inspirational. Maybe it’s so motivational you’d like to look at it in your Bible. If you turn there, you would actually find out the translation is a little bit different. But, you’ve got to fit it on a calendar, so maybe that’s why they messed with the translation a little bit. 

Then you read a little bit more and you realize that it’s not said to you and me; it’s said to Jesus. You think, “Well, by extension, we’re in Christ. What we have, He has.” 

Then you read a little bit more and you realize that this is not something the Father says to His Son. This isn’t a promise from God. These are the words of Satan tempting Jesus to worship the devil!

This is an inspirational calendar encouraging you to worship Satan and commit transgression. This is not an inspirational calendar. This is the calendar from hell! 

And it just goes to show you, misinterpretation is all around us. Just because you open your Bible doesn’t guarantee you get it right. The key issue is whether we correctly understand the Scripture. 

(Adapted from the sermon “Genesis and Myth-busting,” delivered by Dr. Abner Chou, TMC professor of Biblical Studies, at the Unlocking the Mysteries of Genesis Conference on October 11, 2014.)

Those who have attended one of Dr. Chou’s Bible classes at The Master’s College know to arrive at least 10 minutes early if they want to get a seat. Students are willing to stand against the wall or sit on the floor for the chance to hear his teaching. 

Dr. Chou, who will be a featured seminar speaker at the 2016 Shepherd’s Conference, is committed to clearly explaining the Scripture in its context. His love for the gospel and earnest desire to see God’s glory displayed through His Word epitomizes a Biblical Studies education from TMC. Each of our world-renowned professors share that passion.

TMC’s Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies is now available both on campus and online. Our fully accredited online BABS program offers classes in biblical interpretation, Greek, biblical counseling, apologetics, and much more.

TMC Online also has two exciting degree programs in the works. Pending approval by the WASC Senior College and University Commission, a Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Counseling and a Master of Arts in Biblical Studies are scheduled to begin accepting students this summer.

Information about other online degree programs (Organizational Management, Christian Ministries and a Master of Business Administration), general education and dual enrollment options, and our Biblical Equipping Collection of non-credit DVD courses can be found online.

Don’t miss your chance to sit under the teaching of Dr. Abner Chou and the other respected authors, language scholars, scientists, counselors, businessmen, and apologists who comprise our faculty. They seek to see their students—on campus and online—worship God “in spirit and truth” (John 4:24), which is only possible when they are “accurately handling the word of truth” (2 Timothy 2:15).

Contact TMC Online

Phone: 877-302-3337
Email: tmconline@masters.edu
Website: www.masters.edu/academics/online
Facebook: www.facebook.com/themasterscollege/
Twitter: www.twitter.com/masterscollege

February 22, 2016

This sponsored post was prepared by Christopher Ash.

Zeal Without Burnout “I would rather wear out than rust out,” George Whitefield once said.

Many pastors today are doing exactly that: Almost half of US pastors and their wives say they have experienced depression or burnout to the extent that they needed to take a leave of absence from ministry (Today’s Pastors (2014), George Barna). 

Yet many others in pastoral ministry remain quietly skeptical about the phenomenon of “pastor burnout.” Why not burn out for Jesus? After all, did not the Lord Jesus say something to that effect? 

“If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will save it.” (Luke 9 v 23-24, ESV)

Surely the right response to this challenge from the Lord is to throw ourselves wholeheartedly into his service and the service of his gospel, and not to set limits to our self-giving. 

I might have been tempted to think that too—that is, until I came close to the brink of burnout myself. 

I had been working for eight busy years leading a Bible training course in central London. In September 2012 I returned from an intense ministry visit to Australia and Singapore to begin an eagerly anticipated sabbatical term. My wife, Carolyn, was looking forward to sharing those weeks with me. Instead, I hit the wall. My energy plummeted; my mood dipped sharply; my morale went through the floor. And I felt empty, used up, expended. 

My colleagues at work rallied around generously to help me; but it cost them in time and energy—resources they could otherwise have poured into gospel work elsewhere. That’s the problem: we do not sacrifice alone. It may sound heroic, even romantic, to burn out for Jesus. The reality is that others are implicated in our crashes—a spouse, children, ministry colleagues, prayer partners and faithful friends. 

There is a difference between godly sacrifice and needless burnout. After I first gave my first seminar on burnout at the Basics pastors’ conference, a fellow pastor wrote to me:

I put it into terms of fighting fire, as I’m a volunteer firefighter as well as being a pastor. Obviously you have to push yourself physically when fighting a fire. It’s a stretching experience that is uncomfortable and physically difficult. You have to know your limitations while making the sacrifices needed to get the tasks done that must be done.

It’s foolishness to ignore your limitations, try to be the hero, and cramp up, pass out, or have a heart attack while in a burning structure because you’re beyond the limits of what God has supplied you with the capability of doing. It’s a form of heroic suicide that is counterproductive because you’re now no longer effective in fighting fire and the resources that were dedicated to fighting the fire are now dedicated to saving you.

In a similar way, the aim of gospel work is not to be a lone hero, but to work with other gospel workers to spread the gospel of Jesus. 

Living Sacrifices

My reason for writing Zeal without Burnout was to help us discern the difference between sacrifice and foolish heroism, and so to guard against needless burnout. Until God takes us home to be with Jesus, we are to offer ourselves as those who have a life to offer, rather than a burned-out wreck:

Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. (Romans 12 v 1) 

A “living sacrifice” is a strange expression. It means a sacrifice that goes on and on being offered, so long as life lasts. When I am off work because of exhaustion, my body has little to offer; I may feel in pain but the sacrifice is barely alive. How much better to keep plodding on in Christian service if we can! Perhaps the expression “sustainable sacrifice” gets to the heart of the idea—the sort of self-giving living that God enables us to go on giving day after day. 

We are called to sacrifice, and sometimes that sacrifice will damage or even destroy us in this life. However, the best kinds of ministry—whether in a paid or voluntary role—are, more often than not, long term and low key—a marathon, not a short, energetic sprint. So it is my prayer that Zeal without Burnout will help many of my brothers and sisters to maintain their zeal without knowing the bitterness of burnout.

Pre-order Zeal without Burnout: Seven Keys to Lifelong Ministry of Sustainable Sacrifice by Christopher Ash, with a foreword by Alistair Begg, from The Good Book Company or through Amazon

February 15, 2016

Idols of the Heart How many times have you wondered, “Why is being holy such a battle? It seems I start to get things right, and then all my good intentions go flying out the window. Why can’t I get over this (whatever this is) and start living the way I know God wants me to?”

The answer is, we have hearts that are torn between the love and worship of God and the love and worship of the world.

Idols of the Heart is written for those of you who desire to live a godly life and yet find yourself in a recurrently disappointing struggle against habitual sin and a lack of undivided love.

This book is written for you who find yourself constantly tripping over the same bad habit, the same embarrassing weakness, the same sinful slavery that you hoped to be free of years ago.

In Idols of the Heart you’ll learn that idolatry—love gone wrong—lies at the heart of every besetting sin that we struggle with.

Even though we don’t bow down to stone statues or make bowls of food to set before our gods, we worship idols in other ways. Idols aren’t just stone statues. No, idols are the loves, thoughts, desires, longings, and expectations that we worship in the place of the true God. They are the things that we invest our identity in; they are what we trust.

Idols cause us to disregard our Heavenly Father in search of what we think we need. Our idols are our loves—gone—wrong: all those things we love more than we love Him, the things we trust for our righteousness or “okay-ness.”

Yet God loves his people and can use even our messy lives and struggles for his glory. In Idols of the Heart, Elyse Fitzpatrick shows us how to better study and know our hearts, long for our gracious Savior, and resist and crush our false gods.

If you’re ready to begin your study, P&R has put together a free devotional adapted from Idols of the Heart. Join Elyse Fitzpatrick as she walks us through the three facets of the heart, how our heart disease keeps us from obedience, and where to find God’s grace in our struggle with sin. 

Idols of the Heart