Welcome to the online home of Tim Challies, blogger, author, and book reviewer.

Tim Challies

Challies on FacebookChallies on Twitter

A La Carte (3/26)

R.C. Sproul’s book The Truth of the Cross, one of my favorites, is free on Kindle! The Kindle editions of Hendrickson’s Christian Classic series is on sale for just $2.99 each. They include A Practical View of Christianity by William Wilberforce, The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan, Humility and Absolute Surrender by Andrew Murray, Orthodoxy by G.K. Chesterton, The Confessions by St. Augustine, George Muller of Bristol by Arthur Pierson, Foxe’s Book of Martyrs by John Foxe and E.M. Bounds on Prayer.

A Christian Man’s Travel Plan - As someone who travels quite frequently, I enjoyed reading Garrett Kell’s “Christian Man’s Travel Plan.”

Why Christians Should read Fiction - Russell Moore explains why Christians will benefit from enjoying at least some fiction.

Histories of the American South - I’ve really been enjoying Thabiti Anyabwile’s series of posts interacting with Douglas Wilson’s book Black and Tan. This one has some very good thoughts about the book’s strengths and very troubling weaknesses.

Marriage in the Dock - Dr. Mohler: “The next two days are destined to stand as among the most significant days in our nation’s constitutional history, but the issues at stake reach far beyond the U.S. Constitution. Nothing less than marriage is in the dock, with the nation’s highest court set to consider two cases that deal with the question of the legalization of same-sex marriage.”

The Old Man and His Big Book - I enjoyed this article from David Mathis: “Robert Duncan Culver is the only surviving founding member of the Evangelical Theological Society — and his mind is sharp enough to recall his membership number was 158. He taught a combined 25 years at Wheaton College and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and stirred up his share of controversy.”

It is only an infinite God, and an infinite good, that can fill and satisfy the precious and immortal soul of man. —Thomas Brooks