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A La Carte (4/22)

There are a couple of new Kindle deals you may want to check out. A Call to Spiritual Reformation by D.A. Carson ($1.99); Dallas and the Spitfire by Ted Kluck & Dallas Jahncke ($1.99). (A lot of the deals on The Really Big List of Kindle Deals are still valid.)

The Explosion in West, Texas and Fatherhood - Here is a fantastic article from Grant Castleberry: “Losing a father is unspeakably horrific for all children. The son has lost the one person primarily responsible to train him to be a man, and to help him through that process. The daughter has lost her provider, protector, and teacher of being cherished and valued as a woman. I believe this is one reason why God has such a special, tender heart for the fatherless and the widows of the world.”

Police, Citizens and Technology - Here’s a fascinating account of how police tracked down the Boston Marathan bombers. “How federal and local investigators sifted through that ocean of evidence and focused their search on two immigrant brothers is a story of advanced technology and old-fashioned citizen cooperation. It is an object lesson in how hard it is to separate the meaningful from the noise in a world awash with information.”

The Bombers Were Outside Their House - From The Gospel Coalition: “In the early hours of Friday morning, Stephen and Emily McAlpin awoke to the sound of what they thought were fireworks. Within moments, however, it became clear what was happening outside was no celebration. The story that gripped the nation was unfolding in their front yard.”

Jean Segura’s Baserunning Adventures - If you’re a baseball fan you’ll want to read about Jean Segura’s baserunning adventures on Friday night. If you’re not a baseball fan, you’ll be bored silly.

Our Gosnell Gulag - “The Gosnell moment, for that is what it is, presents a clear opportunity for a real change of cultural heart. There are moments when some suppressed or ignored horror comes sharply into focus, and after that, it is not really possible to go back to the way it was before. This is what happened when Solzhenitsyn published his Gulag, for example. Something that had been successfully accommodated became impossible to accommodate any further. It was a conscience moment, which, given the nature of the case, most often come to us unsought. But they do come.”

How can we expect to live with God in heaven if we love not to live with him on earth? —John Mason