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Weekend A La Carte (8/25)

Thriving at College - The Kindle edition of Alex Chediak’s Thriving at College is on sale at just $2.99. Randy Alcorn says of it: “Most Christian young people go to college without specific goals and are unprepared for the challenges that await them. While some prosper spiritually, most get derailed, and an alarming number abandon their faith. Alex has written an insightful and useful book to help college-bound people know what to expect, how to prepare for it, and what to do to avoid the pitfalls.”

4 Responses - “We are facing a true moral inversion — a system of moral understandings turned upside down. Where homosexuality was even recently condemned by the society, now it is considered a sin to believe that homosexuality is wrong in any way.” Al Mohler suggests how Christians are to respond.

Joel Osteen and Family Feud - I enjoyed reading how this person responded to Joel Osteen coming to his hometown. “I had no desire to attend, but I did want to head downtown and do something outside the gathering as an act of quiet personal protest.”

Confused by Complementarianism? - I appreciated Carl Trueman’s thoughts on complementarianism here, and why it, of all issues, has been raised to the status of a “dividing issue.” To be clear, I am not necessarily saying I agree with him; rather, I appreciate the way he makes me think here.

Clouds - A gallery of clouds. Yes, clouds.

The Missing Ingredient - A good word for preachers: “Like cooking, preaching can become bland. It can fail to have that freshness worthy of the gospel table. There are many reasons why. One could identify a lack of preparation, lack of understanding, poor delivery, and shallowness. We would not disagree that under-cooking the homiletical meal is a problem. But there is something else that can make preaching bland: the deadly reality of not being personally wowed by the subject.”

Sin is not so sweet in the committing as it is heavy and bitter in the reckoning. —Richard Sibbes.