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Blogspotting

Blogging is an interactive affair. Not only does it invite comments from readers but it also invites discussion on other blogs. An article posted at one site can generate discussion at many others. It’s a unique and valuable benefit of blogging! I used to expend a bit of effort in drawing the attention of my readers to places where discussion that began here has continued elsewhere but, for some reason (which is probably simple complacency) I stopped doing that. I think it will be valuable to resurrect the habit, so today I’m going to do some blogspotting. This list is far from exhaustive but does point to some of the highlights–places where you can hopefully do some good reading.

At the New City Presbyterian Church blog Tullian Tchividjian mentioned my list of tips to read more and to read better. He follows up with a small list of good books. The list is solid gold!

At Against Heresies Martin interacts with the post on Brian McLaren and the two gospels he contrasts in his new book. Martin says, “The implied contrast between these old and new gospels reminded me of some words penned by Gresham Machen in the 1920s. They give weight to the concern that McLaren’s theology bears more than a passing resemblance to the old liberal gospel.” Machen fought a similar battle almost a century ago and his words ring true today.

TentPeg also reacts to the post and, like Martin, sees that this is essentially liberal theology. “I sometimes wonder if McClaren is aware of the fact that this gospel isn’t really that new or emergent. It’s basically repackaged liberal theology. Jesus came to save us by giving us truth. He shows us what grace, truth, and hope really are. Through his work on this earth and the work God does through it, we can change the world and make it a better place. “The world God dreams of…”? The problem isn’t that the second version is blatantly wrong. It’s just so vague as to be almost meaningless.”

Responding to the article I wrote about the Shorter Catechism, Joe at Emeth Aletheia discussed his family’s catechism practice. “I don’t post this as some legalistic form that everyone should follow. It is something we have been doing and enjoying as a family. If others find it valuable and helpful – fantastic.”

I’d also commend to you the discussion based on this article that happened right here at my blog. You’ll read how other families teach their children the catechism and lead them to a knowledge of Christian doctrine. You can read it here.

Ally at Carpe Diem is another person who is sometimes frozen by the amount of choices she faces.

At Boundless Line Motte Brown talks about the unknowable providence of God. Tom Neven follows Motte’s post with one of his own: Taking God’s Name in Vain. He shares some good insights.


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