Skip to content ↓

Is Your Church Messy Enough?

I love my church. I love the people I gather with week-by-week. They are fun and safe and easy to be with. But who said church should be safe and easy? What if one of the marks of a good church, a blessed church, is that it’s a messy church?

I’m sure you know of the parable of The Lost Sheep in Luke 15. We call it “The Parable of The Lost Sheep” but it is actually “The Parable of the Kind and Loving Shepherd.” The sheep aren’t the point of the story. Like so many of Jesus’ parables, this parable was told in the presence of two groups of people—people who were convinced of their own badness and people who were convinced of their own goodness. And in this case Jesus was speaking primarily to those good and religious people.

The parable is simple: A sheep has wandered off from the flock and become lost. The shepherd will not rest until he has found it and restored it to himself. He goes, he searches, he finds, he restores, he rejoices. Just think about that silly, helpless sheeping, wandering lost and alone in the wilderness. Think about that tired shepherd who had to go wandering far and wide to find him. Think of the ways he could have responded when he finally tracked it down.

The shepherd finds his sheep and rebukes it: “You stupid, ignorant sheep. How dare you wander off from me?” No. He doesn’t rebuke it.

The shepherd finds his sheep and punishes it: “You dumb, disobedient sheep. I’ll teach you to wander off!” No, he doesn’t punish it.

The shepherd finds his sheep and is disgusted by it: “You are filthy and smelly! What on earth did you get into? You go clean yourself up right now and I’ll come back later.” No, he doesn’t make it clean itself up.

The shepherd finds his sheep and sells it: “I can’t have a sheep like you polluting my flock. Do you know how you made me look in front of everyone else?” No, he doesn’t get rid of it.

“And when he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders, rejoicing.” Yeah, that’s the one. When that shepherd finds his sheep, he cares for it. He hoists that big, heavy, dirty sheep onto his shoulders and carries it home, rejoicing all the way. He carries it home and calls his friends and throws a party to celebrate.

He doesn’t save those who are righteous and whose lives are all put together, he saves those who are just plain bad.

The point of the parable is that God loves to save the lost. He loves to save sinners. He doesn’t save those who are righteous and whose lives are all put together, he saves those who are just plain bad. He saves the messy ones, not the ones who are convinced they are clean.

If God is in the business of saving sinners, we need to expect that church will be full of sinners—those who are still wandering and those who have only just been found. If our churches reflect God’s heart for the lost, they will be full of people with problems, full of people showing the consequences of a lifetime of wandering. And this means that church may not be a safe and easy place. It may not be a place full of people who have it all together. It may be messy. It should be messy. Thank God if it is messy.


  • A La Carte Thursday 1

    A La Carte (April 4)

    A La Carte: Only bad Calvinism abandons souls / Is the Lord’s Supper a feast or a funeral? / What does it mean that God rested? / The money problem in cross-cultural partnerships / How do Muslims view the Quran? / Keeping the “para” in parachurch ministries / and more.

  • Random Thoughts on Being a Dad

    Random Thoughts on Being a Dad

    Every now and again I jot down a thought that I’d like to ponder but that I don’t intend to tease out into a full article. Over the past few weeks, I have jotted down a series of thoughts on being a dad. I hope there is something here that benefits you or gets you…

  • A La Carte Collection cover image

    A La Carte (April 3)

    A La Carte: All the sunrises we cannot see / Richard Dawkins says he’s a cultural Christian / The most wonderful sports season of the year / John Piper on the man who died in the pulpit / Let’s talk about how good God is / Jesus died to save us from our own solutions…

  • A La Carte Collection cover image

    A La Carte (April 2)

    A La Carte: Social media poisoning / What about the abused spouse’s sin? / Truth in the age of deception / How can the church serve families touched by autism? / In a scrolling world / Kindle and Logos deals / and more.

  • The Greatest Display of Strength

    This week the blog is sponsored by Moody Publishers, publisher of Overflowing Mercies by Craig Allen Cooper. In the book, Craig opens readers to the beautiful, merciful heart of our triune God. In a culture that is short on compassion, maybe that’s difficult to imagine. There’s not nearly enough patience or tenderness in the world. Maybe…

  • Why Do You Do What You Do

    Why Do You Do What You Do (And Not Something Else)?

    One of my favorite questions for times of small talk is “Why do you do what you do instead of doing something else?” Or sometimes a variation: “Why do you love what you do?” I ask this when I’m in the barber’s chair, on the x-ray table, or trying to articulate words as the dentist…