New & Notable Books (Late July)

I am in the unique and enjoyable position of receiving copies of most of the latest and greatest Christian books. Over the past couple of weeks I’ve received boxes of them and, in sorting through the pile, some have risen to the top.

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Spiritual Disciplines WhitneySpiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life (Second Edition) by Donald Whitney. Whitney’s book was the first I read on the spiritual disciplines and one that was very helpful in my life. I’m very glad to see it (finally!) in a second edition. The publisher says, “Drawn from a rich heritage, Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life will guide you through a carefully selected array of disciplines. By illustrating why the disciplines are important, showing how each one will help you grow in godliness, and offering practical suggestions for cultivating them, Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life will provide you with a refreshing opportunity to become more like Christ and grow in character and maturity. Now updated and revised to equip a new generation of readers, this anniversary edition features in-depth discussions on each of the key disciplines.” (Learn more or buy it at Amazon)

Why God Created the WorldWhy God Created the World: A Jonathan Edwards Adaptation by Ben Stevens. I really like the look of this one. Stevens has taken one of Edwards’ least-known and hardest-to-read books and adapted it to modern readers. Stevens writes, “For most of my life, I never thought to ask myself why God created the world. I had asked myself the question, ‘why did God create me specifically,’ which seemed like a more practical thing to wonder. But the answers I found to that question always struck me as shallow. I think that’s because it’s impossible to understand what part we play in a story if we have never grasped what the story is about in the first place. As far as I know, there has only ever been one book written on this subject by a Christian. It was a monumental treatise by the former president of Princeton University, the 18th century theologian Jonathan Edwards, called A Dissertation Concerning the End for Which the World Was Created (1765). Edwards gives a great answer to the question, but his tone and grammatical acrobatics make the original text nearly impossible to read.” So he modernizes it. (Learn more or buy it at Amazon)

Holding the RopeHolding the Rope: Short Term Missions, Long Term Impact by Clint Archer. This looks like a very helpful book as well: “Holding the Rope gives an insightful look into the preparation, philosophy, and application of short term cross-cultural ministry. Archer addresses the issues with candor, humor, and most importantly, grace. He provides viable solutions to common problems, and encourages churches, pastors, and volunteers to adopt a biblical and practical approach for engaging in short term missions. ‘Holding the rope’ is more than a catchphrase. It articulates an entire philosophy of ministry. Christian missions is too daunting an enterprise to attempt alone, but the synergy of combined efforts can accomplish untold advancement for the kingdom of God. This book is a tool for those serving the servants, a guide and celebration of those who hold the ropes.” (Learn more or buy it at Amazon)

Wonder-Working GodThe Wonder-Working God: Seeing the Glory of Jesus in His Miracles by Jared Wilson. I really enjoy Wilson’s books; this one looks as good as the ones before it. Here is what Crossway says about it: “Do you believe in miracles? Walking on water. Multiplying the fish and the loaves. Raising Lazarus from the dead. The miracles of Jesus may be well known, but they’re often misunderstood. In The Wonder-Working God, pastor Jared Wilson wants to help us see that there’s more than meets the eye when it comes to the miraculous events recorded in the Gospels. From the humble wonder of the incarnation to the blinding glory of the transfiguration, this book shows how Jesus’s miracles reveal his divinity, authority, and ultimate mission: restoring us and this world to a right relationship with God.” (Learn more or buy it at Amazon)

Connected Erin DavisConnected: Curing the Pandemic of Everyone Feeling Alone Together by Erin Davis. This is one of those books that addresses a new and nearly-universal concern. Here is what the publisher says about it: “Technology has allowed us to connect with more people in more places than ever before. Sure we have ‘friends’ we even have ‘followers’ and yet, a silent epidemic is sending shock waves straight into our living rooms. What is this hidden disease? Loneliness. Popular author Erin Davis knows what it’s like to feel lonely. She knows how it feels to have many friends, a full schedule, and a pit in her stomach. As she wrestled her own feelings of loneliness to the ground, Erin started to feel like the scientist charged with finding the cure for the lonely epidemic—a journey that has proved to be funny, encouraging, and helpful.” (Learn more or buy it at Amazon)