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A La Carte (6/11)

Bruce Ware’s Father, Son and Holy Spirit, an excellent book on the Trinity, is just $3.99. Here are a couple more deals: Hitler in the Crosshairs by John Woodbridge ($3.99); The Case for Christ Student Edition by Lee Strobel ($2.99); The Student Edition of The Case for Faith (which I haven’t read) is also at $2.99.

Filled with Frogs - Mark Altrogge: “If Pittsburgh were overrun by frogs, and even the Steelers had frogs in their bedrooms, I don’t think I’d forget that.  But God knows our tendency to forget, so he warned Israel about forgetting his mighty deliverance. And you know what? They forgot.”

The Sufficiency of Scripture - The sufficiency of Scripture is a very important doctrine that we neglect to our peril. This is a good article to read in order to brush up on what it means and why it matters.

The Thrill of the Chaste - From Christianity Today: “Women have always longed for the men of romance novels. In some ways, that’s what romance novels are for. The latest romance subgenre, though, has its own effects. Not only may readers of Amish fiction compare their husbands’ bodies to a hunky hero like Levi Yoder, but also their own households to the bucolic, romanticized Amish life.”

The Glory of God - If you’ve ever tried to define what you mean by “the glory of God” you know just how difficult it is. Andy Naselli looks to a ThM thesis and offers help.

Ask.fm - CNet writes about another place teens are hanging out online: “Spy on Ask.fm’s public stream and you’ll feel like you’ve been transported back to middle school, dumped in the center of he-said, she-said dramas — sometimes innocuous, sometimes not. Here, hormone-crazed young boys and girls banter about their after-school plans, tease their peers, boast about their most recent hookups, and try to appear cool with expletives and graphic language.”

The more purely God’s word is preached, the more deeply it pierces and the more kindly it works. —William Gouge