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Weekend A La Carte (9/21)

You may notice a few changes around the site today; it has been a long time coming, but I’ve finally completely overhauled the look and feel of the site. I’ll explain more about that soon. But for now, here is some weekend reading.

Here are a few new Kindle deals: From the Resurrection to His Return by D.A. Carson ($2.99); The Dawkins Letters by David Robertson ($3.99); Firm Foundations by Peter Grainger ($3.99). All of these will be ending soon: The Explicit Gospel by Matt Chandler ($3.99); Gospel Deeps by Jared Wilson ($2.99); Rhythms of Grace by Mike Cosper ($2.99); Gospel-Centered Discipleship by Jonathan Dodson ($1.99); Am I Called? by Dave Harvey ($0.99); A Better Way by Michael Horton ($3.99); Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal by Michael Kelley ($2.99).

Rabbi Philip Berg - This is a fascinating obit. “Rabbi Philip Berg, who has died aged 84, led the modern Kabbalah movement, an esoteric strain of ancient Jewish mysticism that became a pop culture phenomenon embraced by scores of A-list celebrities — most notably Madonna — but derided by critics as Hollywood’s new ‘non-religion’ and even ‘the McDonald’s of spirituality’.”

The Gospel for Family and Friends - Here are five brief tips on sharing the gospel in the most intimidating mission field of all—family and friends.

The Female Holocaust - WORLD shines a light on a horrifying practice. “ Indian parents killed an estimated 6 million girls in the last decade, but U.S. lawmakers can’t agree on what to do about it.”

Ordinary Daily Devotions - Here are six benefits of ordinary daily devotions.

Zobrist’s Leadership - I love to see the good guys in the news, and Ben Zobrist is one of them. Last night’s game was an example of how valuable he is to the team! (And stay tuned next year for his biography…)

That Their Faith Would Not Fail - From Lore Ferguson: “I woke this morning with words of prayer on my mouth. Not prayers for me or prayers for my friends, but prayers for my pastors. I go to a large church with many pastors and their job is difficult. They shepherd, lead, teach, preach, train, study, repent, and live very publicly.”

Before we can begin to see the cross as something done for us, we have to see it as something done by us. —John Stott