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Books I Didn't Review

Today I’ve got another batch of books that I didn’t review. Life is such that there are lots of great books that I just cannot find the time to read and many other books I’m simply not qualified to review. These books tend to find their way into these round-ups of the ones I received and looked at but for one reason or another just couldn’t review. I list them here in the hopes that at least some of them will be of interest to at least some of you!

Redeeming Church Conflicts by Tara Barthel and David Edling – “In this purposeful and practical book, two church-conflict resolution experts take readers through the Acts 15 model of approaching conflict in order to help them understand the intricacies of their church conflict. The book provides a clear, godly way forward into redemptive reconciliation, regardless of how the people involved in the conflict respond or fail to respond.”

The Epistle to the Hebrews by Gareth Lee Cockerill – In this volume from the NICNT series, “Cockerill analyzes the book’s rhetorical, chiastic shape and interprets each passage in light of this overarching structure. He also offers a new analysis of the epistle’s use of the Old Testament — continuity and fulfillment rather than continuity and discontinuity — and shows how this consistent usage is relevant for contemporary biblical interpretation. Written in a clear, engaging, and accessible style, this commentary will benefit pastors, laypeople, students, and scholars alike.”

The Church by Mark Dever – “A church’s life, doctrine, worship, and even polity are important issues. Yet they are so rarely addressed. The Church is Mark Dever’s primer on the doctrine of the church for all who see Scripture alone as a sufficient authority for the doctrine and life of the local church. He explains to the reader what the Bible says about the nature and purpose of the church—what it is, what it’s for, what it does.”

The Roots of the Reformation by G. R. Evans – “Contravening traditional paradigms of interpretation, Evans charts the controversies and challenges that roiled the era of the Reformation and argues that these are really part of a much longer history of discussion and disputation. … She demonstrates that in many ways the Reformation was in considerable continuity with the periods that preceded it, though the consequential outcome of the debates in the sixteenth century was dramatically different.”

The Lectio Continua Expository Commentary on Galatians by J.V. Fesko – “The Lectio Continua Expository Commentary on the New Testament is not meant to be an academic or highly technical series. There are many helpful exegetical commentaries written for that purpose. Rather, the aim is to provide lectio continua sermons which clearly and faithfully communicate the context, meaning, gravity and application of God’s inerrant Word. Each volume of expositions aspires to be redemptive-historical, covenantal, Reformed and confessional, trinitarian, person-and-work-of-Christ-centered, and teeming with practical application.” This is the initial volume in what appears to be a promising set.

The Wisdom of God by Nancy Guthrie – “This 10-week study of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon mines the Wisdom Literature not only for wise principles for living, but also for the wise person these books point to through their drama, poetry, proverb, and song—Jesus.”

God’s Good Design by Claire Smith – “Although Claire Smith was a young adult when she came to know Jesus, it wasn’t until she went to theological college that she noticed parts of the Bible that challenged her feminist views. Studying these passages led to radical changes in her life. … Claire takes us through the same process she went through herself, looking closely at seven key Bible passages about men and women and how they should relate together in God’s purposes. Along the way she deals with many common objections, and applies the teaching of the Bible simply and practically to our relationships at home and in church.”

The Holy Spirit by Geoffrey Thomas – “Geoff Thomas shows us that the Holy Spirit is both infinitely glorious and intensely personal. Neither a theory nor a force, the Spirit is God and acts as our God in gathering a people to Himself. This book follows the scriptural revelation of the Spirit from Genesis to Pentecost to today, covering such topics as His personality and Deity, His inspiration and anointing in the Old Testament, His conviction and regeneration, the spiritual gifts, putting to death sinful deeds by the Spirit, His sealing, and spiritual revival.”

Turning to God by David Wells – “Does a person have to “convert” to be a Christian? Or can one merely “follow” Jesus by studying Scripture? Does the Bible ever say that conversion is necessary? Or is it a development of the church? Turning to God explores these fundamental questions about regeneration and conversion, distinguishing Christianity from every other faith as one in which conversion is unique, supernatural, and necessary for salvation. In it you will find a clear, thoughtful, balanced discussion of the Christian conversion experience, including its history, controversy, and scriptural basis.”