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Books I Didn't Review

Today I’ve got another batch of books that I didn’t review. Life is such that there are lots of great books that I just cannot find the time to read and many other books I’m simply not qualified to review. These books tend to find their way into these round-ups of the ones I received and looked at but for one reason or another just couldn’t review. I list them here in the hopes that at least some of them will be of interest to at least some of you!

Safe: How to Protect Yourself, Your Family, and Your Home by Wayne LaPierre. “This year, hundreds of thousands of American families will face natural and man-made disasters including floods, fires, hurricanes, tornados and more. Millions of adults and children alike will be killed or seriously injured in preventable accidents - family crises that don’t have to happen. Millions more will be victimized by criminals, burglars, child predators, identity thieves and scam artists. If you want to take the right steps to prepare and protect the things that are most important to you - your family, your home, your financial future - then you owe to yourself and your family to read this book.” It’s rather an interesting idea, I suppose. This book simply shares ways that you can prepare yourself to be safe from crisis and disaster.

Catholicism: East of Eden by Richard Bennett. “Richard Bennett was born into a devout Roman Catholic home in Dublin Ireland. His early years were spent in Belvedere Jesuit School. Eight years of theological instruction for the priesthood followed under the instruction of the Dominican Order with his formal education culminating in 1964 at the Angelicum University of Rome. As a young priest, Richard (Peter) was assigned to the West Indies. He spent the next twenty-one years in Trinidad, mostly serving as a parish priest applying Roman Catholic teaching to everyday life. After a serious accident in which he nearly lost his life, he began to seriously study the Scriptures. After fourteen years of contrasting the teachings of Rome with biblical truth, he was convicted by the Gospel message through God’s grace alone and in 1986 he formally left the Roman Catholic Church and its priesthood.” This book addresses the 21st century issues of Catholicism and does so with candor, with empathy but, most importantly, with biblical firmness. If you are grappling with Catholicism, this is a good resource to turn to.

Collected Writings on Scripture by D.A. Carson. “God’s Word has always had enemies, but in recent years the inspiration and authority of Scripture have been attacked with renewed vigor. Respected scholar D. A. Carson has written widely on the nature of Scripture over the past thirty years, and here presents a timely collection of his work in two parts. In part 1, Carson selects essays written on such themes as how to interpret the Bible, recent developments in the doctrine of Scripture, unity and diversity in the New Testament, and redaction criticism. Presenting a theologically balanced and confessional perspective, Carson defines the terms of a number of debates, critiques interpretive methods and theories, and suggests positive guidelines for future action. Part 2 presents critical reviews of nine books dealing with the inspiration and authority of Scripture. Though substantial in content, Carson’s detailed reviews will foster careful thought and perspective in those who are relatively new to the debates surrounding biblical inspiration and authority.”

Pilgrim of the Heavenly Way by Daniel Smith. “Daniel Smith was a very average boy born to ordinary Scottish parents in 1907. But at the age of eighteen this shy descendant of the Scottish Covenanters was converted to Christ. Despite naturally being of little account, and certainly not possessing any innate talent for the task, the Lord Jesus Christ fitted him for service and gave him the great honor of taking the Gospel of God all around the world. As a missionary in the northeast portion of China’s Yunnan province during the time surrounding the Communist takeover of that region, he took part in a mighty saving work of God among the Nosu tribes. Later he worked in Sri Lanka and India before ministering for some years in the West, and finally exercising an itinerant ministry in churches around the world. Though the book is an autobiography, Dan’s emphasis is not so much to tell the reader about himself and his life, but to humbly relate the many things God has done for him and through him, and in so doing to stimulate our faith, confidence, and maturity in Christ.”

The Book of Hosea by J. Andrew Dearman. “Here J. Andrew Dearman considers the historical context of the prophetic figure of Hosea, his roots in the prophetic activity and covenant traditions of ancient Israel, and the poetic and metaphorical aspects of the prophecy. This historical and theological commentary is a welcome addition to the NICOT series.” I haven’t yet read the commentary, but have enjoyed the NICOT series and am glad to continue to see them working toward finishing the whole Old Testament.

Ephesians: God’s Big Plan for Christ’s New People by Thabit Anyabwile. This is a study guide to Ephesians prepared by Thabiti Anyabwile. “In his letter to the Ephesians, the apostle Paul says a firm “no” to this idea. The church of Christ far from being an optional extra; it is the display of God’s wisdom to the universe! The church is God’s handiwork, made up of people from every conceivable background, living under the gracious rule of Jesus himself. To be a part of the church is to be hand-selected by God through Christ to make visible the mystery of God’s electing love. The ten studies in this Good Book Guide will help groups and individuals discover the richness of God’s grace towards His people, and grow as the body of Christ.”